juniper

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ju·ni·per

 (jo͞o′nə-pər)
n.
Any of various evergreen trees or shrubs of the genus Juniperus, having needlelike or scalelike, often pointed leaves and aromatic, bluish-gray, berrylike seed-bearing cones.

[Middle English, from Latin iūniperus; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

juniper

(ˈdʒuːnɪpə)
n
1. (Plants) any coniferous shrub or small tree of the genus Juniperus, of the N hemisphere, having purple berry-like cones. The cones of J. communis (common or dwarf juniper) are used as a flavouring in making gin. See also red cedar1
2. (Plants) any of various similar trees, grown mainly as ornamentals
3. (Bible) Old Testament one of the trees used in the building of Solomon's temple (I Kings 6:15, 34) and for shipbuilding (Ezekiel 27:5)
[C14: from Latin jūniperus, of obscure origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ju•ni•per

(ˈdʒu nə pər)

n.
any of several evergreen shrubs or trees of the genus Juniperus, of the cypress family, having scaly leaves and berrylike cones that yield an oil used in flavoring gin.
[1350–1400; Middle English junipere < Latin jūniperus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juniper - desert shrub of Syria and Arabia having small white flowersjuniper - desert shrub of Syria and Arabia having small white flowers; constitutes the juniper of the Old Testament; sometimes placed in genus Genista
genus Retama, Retama - small genus of Mediterranean shrubs; often included in genus Genista
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.juniper - coniferous shrub or small tree with berrylike cones
cypress - wood of any of various cypress trees especially of the genus Cupressus
juniper berry - berrylike fruit of a plant of the genus Juniperus especially the berrylike cone of the common juniper
pencil cedar, pencil cedar tree - any of several junipers with wood suitable for making pencils
Juniperus silicicola, southern red cedar - juniper of swampy coastal regions of southeastern United States; similar to eastern red cedar
Juniperus sabina, savin, dwarf juniper - procumbent or spreading juniper
common juniper, Juniperus communis - densely branching shrub or small tree having pungent blue berries used to flavor gin; widespread in northern hemisphere; only conifer on coasts of Iceland and Greenland
dwarf juniper, Juniperus communis depressa, ground cedar - a procumbent variety of the common juniper
creeping juniper, Juniperus horizontalis - low to prostrate shrub of Canada and northern United States; bronzed purple in winter
drooping juniper, Juniperus flaccida, Mexican juniper - small tree of western Texas and mountains of Mexico having spreading branches with drooping branchlets
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ثَمَرَة العَرْعَر
jalovec
enebærbusk
boróka
einir
kadagys
kadiķis
jalovec
ardıç

juniper

[ˈdʒuːnɪpəʳ]
A. Nenebro m
B. CPD juniper berries NPLbayas fpl de enebro
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

juniper

[ˈdʒuːnɪr] n (= bush) → genévrier m
juniper berry → baie f de genièvre
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

juniper

nWacholder m; juniper berryWacholderbeere f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

juniper

[ˈdʒuːnɪpəʳ] nginepro
juniper berry → bacca di ginepro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

juniper

(ˈdzuːnipə) noun
a type of evergreen shrub with berries and prickly leaves.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
All round this garden, in the uncultivated parts, red partridges ran about in conveys among the brambles and tufts of junipers, and at every step of the comte and Raoul a terrified rabbit quitted his thyme and heath to scuttle away to the burrow.
For December, and January, and the latter part of November, you must take such things as are green all winter: holly; ivy; bays; juniper; cypress-trees; yew; pine-apple-trees; fir-trees; rosemary; lavender; periwinkle, the white, the purple, and the blue; germander; flags; orangetrees; lemon-trees; and myrtles, if they be stoved; and sweet marjoram, warm set.
Wherein I, for my part, do not like images cut out in juniper or other garden stuff; they be for children.
The standards to be roses; juniper; holly; berberries (but here and there, because of the smell of their blossoms); red currants; gooseberries; rosemary; bays; sweetbriar; and such like.
It was set about with hawthorn hedges and juniper bushes, and on the small, green branches sat a little nightingale, which sang so loud and clear "that all the garden and the walls rang right with the song." Prince James leaned from his window listening to the song of the birds, and watching them as they hopped from branch to branch, preening themselves in the early sunshine and twittering to their mates.
Toward night candles were burning round his coffin, a pall was spread over it, the floor was strewn with sprays of juniper, a printed band was tucked in under his shriveled head, and in a corner of the room sat a chanter reading the psalms.
A little ways off, beyond a line of scattered juniper trees, which marked the pathway to the church, a white dim figure flitted in the direction of the tomb.
Usually, a telephone pole is made from a sixty-year-old tree, a cedar, chestnut, or juniper. It lasts twelve years only, so that the one item of poles is still costing the telephone companies several millions a year.
I was telling my horticulture friend how much I love junipers. She looked at me in disbelief.
Junipers gobble up to 35 gallons of water a day - apiece.
Young junipers take up to four years to reach the 15cm to 20cm height necessary for planting.
Many pines and junipers are drought-tolerant, but scotch pine also boasts an impressive growth rate, ranging from a foot to 18 inches or more yearly, depending on location.