junk DNA


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junk DNA

a region of DNA that usually consists of a repeating DNA sequence, does not code for protein, and has no known function
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

junk DNA

n.
A DNA sequence that is part of a genome and is not known to code for proteins or to regulate the expression of genes. Junk DNA may constitute up to 95 percent of the human genome and is postulated to be involved in the evolution of new genes and possibly the repair of genes.

[From junk.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

junk DNA

n
(Genetics) DNA that consists of repeated sequences of nucleotide and has no apparent function
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

junk DNA


n.
segments of DNA that have no apparent genetic function.
[1990–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.junk DNA - stretches of DNA that do not code for genes; "most of the genome consists of junk DNA"
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
nichtkodierende Desoxyribonukleinsäurenichtkodierende DNS
skräp-DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
On the surface the differences are simple and explicit in the names WGS provides the sequence of the genomic (nuclear) DNA from a sample including all sorts of noncoding regions such as centromeres, telomeres, long repetitive stretches of "junk DNA, and various un-transcribed control regions which influence the activity of the actual genes.
What was once known as junk DNA turns out to hold hidden treasures, says computational biologist Ewan Birney.
The rest is so-called junk DNA, or useless but harmless DNA.
The first step involved copying DNA sequence already present in yeast (leaving out the so-called junk DNA that, to our best knowledge, does not serve any purpose).
But recent research has revealed that up to 80 per cent of junk DNA is also transcribed to RNA, but not to make proteins.
Section Two: Biological Information and Genetic Theory Wells presents evidence for the functionality of non -protein-coding DNA to refute the concept of "junk DNA." This includes pervasive transcription of the genome, conservation of many nonprotein-coding sequences, sequence-dependent functions of RNAs transcribed from introns, pseudogenes, repetitive DNA, functions almost independent of the exact nucleotide sequence, chromatin topology in gene expression and centromere placement, and the light-focusing property of heterochromatin in inverted nuclei.
(109) Junk DNA consists of a "noncoding region" of DNA that identifies the owner of the DNA without showing more "far-reaching and complex characteristics like genetic traits." (110) The Court noted that the Maryland Act (111) required that law enforcement officers swab the inside cheek of the individual's mouth to collect skin cells with the intent to use this information to identify the individual.
These genes are involved in a giant sea of various types of non-coding sequences which compose 98.6% of HG (misnamed popularly as "junk DNA").
He argues that the so-called "junk DNA" consists of silent genes that are not subject to the normal processes of natural selection and thus can evolve freely over long periods of time without adversely affecting the host organisms.
Also removed was what is popularly termed junk DNA, including base pairs known not to encode for any particular proteins, and "jumping gene" segments known to randomly move around and introduce mutations.