Junkers


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Related to Junkers: Hugo Junkers

Jun·kers

 (yo͝ong′kərz, -kərs), Hugo 1859-1935.
German aircraft engineer who designed the first successful all-metal airplane (1915) and helped establish early mail and passenger airlines.

Junkers

(ˈjʊŋkəz)
n
(Biography) Hugo. 1859–1935, German aircraft designer. His military aircraft were used in both World Wars
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Noun1.Junkers - German aircraft engineer who designed the first all-metal airplane (1859-1935)Junkers - German aircraft engineer who designed the first all-metal airplane (1859-1935)
References in classic literature ?
But the Baron and Baroness are members of an older generation, as well as Prussian Junkers and landowners.
Our young man was a stiff conservative, a Junker of Junkers; he thought modern democracy a temporary phase and expected to find many arguments against it in the great Republic.
Flying Man: Hugo Junkers and the Dream of Aviation by Richard Byers.
In the 1930s, Marga von Etzdorf operated a Junkers A50 named "Kiek in die Welt", having already flown Junkers F13 commercial airliners for the former Luft Hansa as a co-pilot in 1927.
Germany's FW 200 served long and well but the aircraft reached the end of its usefulness by late 1943, although a few of the aircraft flew the occasional mission when not enough of the big Junkers that succeeded them were available.
I was excited about reading this book, because Hugo Junkers had designed and flown the world's first all-metal monoplane, and his name was associated with some of the great Luftwaffe airpower of World War II.
An all-new Junkers F13 monoplane built from the original 1919 blueprints flew for the first time, in September.
On one notable occasion in 1940, a Spitfire of No 72 Squadron RAF flying out of Woolsington shot down a Junkers Ju88 bomber at night - a remarkable achievement for an aircraft considered unsuitable for night fighting.
He was hit by friendly fire from a Spitfire chasing a Junkers 88 over Edinburgh.
It took place between the crew of a shot-down Luftwaffe Junkers 88, who armed themselves with machine guns from the aircraft, and the London Irish Rifles, led by Captain John Cantopher and later awarded the George Medal.