juryless

juryless

(ˈdʒʊərɪləs)
adj
without a jury
References in periodicals archive ?
"There was a whole process whereby applications were made for a juryless trial, which were turned down.
He added: "Applications were made for a juryless trial, which were turned down.
147); third, the legislature's capacity to create juryless tribunals, which usurps the jury's power to determine money damages and fines (p.
Portraitist Robert Henri is well known in the history of American modernism for promoting a succession of juryless, artist-organised exhibitions during the first two decades of the twentieth century and for influencing hundreds of students through his teaching.
During the three decades of political and sectarian strife in Northern Ireland that claimed 3,600 lives and injured another 36,000 more, Irish courts regularly refused to extradite terrorism suspects to Northern Ireland on the grounds that they faced possible torture or trials in juryless courts where impartiality could not be guaranteed.
Though the latter jurisdiction took some extraordinary measures, such as the use of juryless courts, anything that could be interpreted as preventive detention was long avoided.
And the beneficiaries of trusts, the cestuis que trust, are now empowered to complain to the Chancellor and enforce their putative rights, bringing the widest evidence of trust breaches before a juryless court in order to achieve justice.
Thus, Massachusetts's constitution restricted the type of juryless
(530) The limitation device in such cases is used as a weapon by shipowners to force low settlements and possibly juryless trials.
continued juryless courts in Northern Ireland in a temporary subsection
A Bill currently being considered by Parliament would allow prosecutors to apply for a juryless trial, subject to approval from a High Court judge and the Lord Chief Justice.
A Bill would allow prosecutors to apply for a juryless trial, subject to approval from a High Court judge and the Lord Chief Justice.