justiciary

(redirected from justiciaries)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

jus·ti·ci·ar·y

 (jŭ-stĭsh′ē-ĕr′ē) also jus·ti·ci·ar (-ē-ər)
n. pl. jus·ti·ci·ar·ies also jus·ti·ci·ars
A high judicial officer in medieval England.

[Medieval Latin iūstitiāria, from feminine of iūstitiārius, of the administration of justice, from Latin iūstitia, justice; see justice.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

justiciary

(dʒʌˈstɪʃɪərɪ)
adj
(Law) of or relating to the administration of justice
n, pl -aries
1. (Professions) an officer or administrator of justice; judge
2. (Law) another word for justiciar
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jus•ti•ci•ar•y

(dʒʌˈstɪʃ iˌɛr i)

adj., n., pl. -ar•ies. adj.
1. of or pertaining to the administration of justice.
n.
2. the office or jurisdiction of a justiciar.
[1470–80; < Medieval Latin jūsticiārius]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.justiciary - formerly a high judicial officer
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
judge, jurist, justice - a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justice
2.justiciary - the jurisdiction of a justiciar
jurisdiction - in law; the territory within which power can be exercised
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
All at once he broke out explosively, " Pasque-Dieu !" What people are those who claim to be voyers, justiciaries, lords and masters in our domains?
Alexis de Tocqueville wrote about this feudal institution: Certain customs restrict the right of having pigeon-houses to high justiciaries; others grant it to all owners of feuds.
For another key phrase of Bracton's formulation of the writ of habeas corpus is "before our justiciaries".