jute


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Jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
A member of a Germanic people who invaded Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad and settled in the south and southeast and on the Isle of Wight.

[From Middle English Jutes, the Jutes, from Medieval Latin Iutae, from Old English Iotas, Iutan; akin to Old English Gēat, Geat.]

Jute, Jut′ish adj.

jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
1. Either of two Asian plants (Corchorus capsularis or C. olitorius) yielding a fiber used for sacking and cordage.
2. The fiber obtained from these plants.

[Bengali jhuṭo, from Sanskrit jūṭaḥ, twisted hair, probably of Dravidian origin.]

jute

(dʒuːt)
n
1. (Plants) either of two Old World tropical yellow-flowered herbaceous plants, Corchorus capsularis or C. olitorius, cultivated for their strong fibre: family Tiliaceae
2. (Plants) this fibre, used in making sacks, rope, etc
[C18: from Bengali jhuto, from Sanskrit jūta braid of hair, matted hair]

Jute

(dʒuːt)
n
(Peoples) a member of one of various Germanic tribes, some of whom invaded England in the 6th century ad, settling in Kent

jute

(dʒut)

n.
1. a strong, coarse fiber used for making burlap, gunny, cordage, etc., obtained from two East Indian plants, Corchorus capsularis and C. olitorius, of the linden family.
2. either of these plants.
[1740–50; < Bengali jhuṭo]
jute′like`, adj.

Jute

(dʒut)

n.
a member of a Germanic people that invaded Britain in the 5th century a.d., settling mainly in Kent.
Jut′ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jute - a plant fiber used in making rope or sacksjute - a plant fiber used in making rope or sacks
rope - a strong line
bagging, sacking - coarse fabric used for bags or sacks
plant fiber, plant fibre - fiber derived from plants
2.Jute - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Saxons to become Anglo-Saxons
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Translations
قِنَّب
jutajutový
jute
juta
júta; basttrefjar
džiutas
džuta
jutajutový
Hint keneviri/kendiri

Jute

[dʒuːt] Njuto/a m/f

jute

[dʒuːt] Nyute m

jute

[ˈdʒuːt]
njute m
modif [sack, bag] → de jute; [crop, mill] → de jute

jute

nJute f

jute

[dʒuːt] niuta

jute

(dʒuːt) noun, adjective
(of) the fibre of certain plants found in Pakistan and India, used for making sacks etc.
References in classic literature ?
So I got a job at the jute mills--a ten-hour day at ten cents an hour.
It was in the dock in Dundee, where we had brought a full cargo of jute from Calcutta.
At fifteen she had graduated from grammar school and gone to work in the jute mills for four dollars a week, three of which she had paid to Sarah.
When you left the orphan asylum and how old you were, how long you worked in the jute mills, the cannery, the paper-box factory, the laundry--maybe you think I can't do addition.
There are the jute mills, you know, and the same thing goes on there.
The Angles, Saxons, and Jutes occupied territories in the region which includes parts of the present Holland, of Germany about the mouth of the Elbe, and of Denmark.
the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes began to harry the southern and eastern shores of Britain, where the Romans were obliged to maintain a special military establishment against them.
In my "Authoress of the Odyssey" I thought "Jutland" would be a suitable translation, but it has been pointed out to me that "Jutland" only means the land of the Jutes.
She gave jute production and jute the status of agricultural goods and extending same facilities to the agriculture sector for its production, marketing and export.
In a study, researchers tested the antacid properties of jute leaves (ewedu) in male albino rats with gastric ulcer over a two-week period reduced the stomach acid production in a dose-dependent manner.
New Delhi [India], Jan 3 ( ANI ): The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA), chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, approved the mandatory packaging of foodgrains and sugar in the jute material for the Jute Year 2017-18.
The products that witnessed positive growth in production on year-on-year basis, included Motor spirits, High Speed Diesel, Diesel oil, Furnace oil, Jute batching oil and LPG .