kabaka

(redirected from kabakas)

kabaka

(kaˈbaka)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of the former rulers of the Baganda people of S Uganda
[C19: from Luganda]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) Ozcelik IB, Kuvat SV, Sacak B, Mersa B, Kabakas F, Purisa H.
Situated on Kasubi Hill within Kampala, and classified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 2001, four important Kabakas of the 19th and 20th centuries are today resting in similar cone-shaped edifices.
The thirtieth Kabaka (leader) of Buganda imposed a strict rule on his population.
However, the Buganda Kingdom was almost ruined forever when Uganda's first post-independence Prime Minister Milton Obote (later president) abolished it in 1966, almost destroying its palaces as well as one of the world's biggest royal mausoleums in the world--the Kasubi tombs, which reportedly date back to the 13th century and are the revered burial ground of the Kingdom's Kabakas (kings).
After its abolition by the new Prime Minister, the Kabaka, Sir Edward Mutesa II, who became non-executive president in the newly independent Uganda under Obote, flea into exile in London where his son--the current Kabaka, Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II (37th on the throne on Buganda's patrilineal inheritance)--was raised and attended the University of Cambridge.
Kampala, like Rome, is built on a series of seven hills; it offers the visitor a mosque, the tombs of Kabakas, and the Uganda Museum.
It may seem strange to think of African music as having any history since it seems to live so much for the present -- its songs are so often filled with up-to-date topics and are, of course, unnotated -- yet Kyabaggu's singer-bards, playing on arched harps very similar to those decorating the temples and walls of the tombs of the ancient pharaohs of Egypt, could recite the genealogies of 24 kabakas before him.
The light springy rhythms of the songs made this music a favourite with several kabakas.
The lineage of the Buganda monarchy, one of the best-known in Africa, is said to go back to nearly 40 kings (Kabakas), the first of them Kintu, in about AD1300.
As for me, it has latterly come to my knowledge that our family was central in the Mamba Ennangira, the princely section of the Mamba clan from which the Buganda Kabakas, 49 or 50 of them before Kintu, came.
Each prince and princess who is a descendant of the four Kabakas has also been buried at Kasubi Tombs.
The Kasubi Tombs, a 10-minute drive from the centre of the Ugandan capital, Kampala, are the burial grounds of the Kabaka, the kings of Buganda, the largest ethnic group in Uganda.