kaleidoscope


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ka·lei·do·scope

 (kə-lī′də-skōp′)
n.
1. A tube-shaped optical instrument that is rotated to produce a succession of symmetrical designs by means of mirrors reflecting the constantly changing patterns made by small objects, such as beads or bits of colored glass, at one end of the tube.
2. A constantly changing set of colors.
3. A series of changing phases or events: a kaleidoscope of illusions.

[Greek kalos, beautiful + eidos, form; see weid- in Indo-European roots + -scope.]

ka·lei′do·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk), ka·lei′do·scop′i·cal adj.
ka·lei′do·scop′i·cal·ly adv.

kaleidoscope

(kəˈlaɪdəˌskəʊp)
n
1. (General Physics) an optical toy for producing symmetrical patterns by multiple reflections in inclined mirrors enclosed in a tube. Loose pieces of coloured glass, paper, etc, are placed between transparent plates at the far end of the tube, which is rotated to change the pattern
2. any complex pattern of frequently changing shapes and colours
3. a complicated set of circumstances
[C19: from Greek kalos beautiful + eidos form + -scope]
kaleidoscopic adj
kaˌleidoˈscopically adv

ka•lei•do•scope

(kəˈlaɪ dəˌskoʊp)

n.
1. a tubular optical instrument in which loose bits of colored glass at the end of the tube are reflected in mirrors so as to display ever-changing symmetrical patterns as the tube is rotated.
2. a continually shifting pattern, scene, or the like.
[1817; < Greek kal(ós) beautiful + eîdo(s) shape (compare eidetic) + -scope]
ka•lei`do•scop′ic (-ˈskɒp ɪk) adj.
ka•lei`do•scop′i•cal•ly, adv.

kaleidoscope

an optical device composed of bits of colored glass and several reflecting surfaces that presents to the viewer symmetrical patterns when shaken or rotated. — kaleidoscopic, adj.
See also: Instruments
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kaleidoscope - a complex pattern of constantly changing colors and shapes
pattern, form, shape - a perceptual structure; "the composition presents problems for students of musical form"; "a visual pattern must include not only objects but the spaces between them"
2.kaleidoscope - an optical toy in a tubekaleidoscope - an optical toy in a tube; it produces symmetrical patterns as bits of colored glass are reflected by mirrors
plaything, toy - an artifact designed to be played with
Translations
kalejdoskop
kaléidoscopecaléidoscope
kaleidoszkóp
kviksjá
kaleidoskopaskaleidoskopiškas
kaleidoskops
kaleidoskop
çiçek dürbünükaleydoskop

kaleidoscope

[kəˈlaɪdəskəʊp] Ncalidoscopio m, caleidoscopio m

kaleidoscope

[kəˈlaɪdəskəʊp] nkaléidoscope m

kaleidoscope

nKaleidoskop nt; a kaleidoscope of emotionein Wechselspiel ntder Gefühle

kaleidoscope

[kəˈlaɪdəˌskəʊp] ncaleidoscopio

kaleidoscope

(kəˈlaidəskəup) noun
a tube-shaped toy in which loose coloured pieces of glass etc reflected in two mirrors form changing patterns.
kaˌleidoˈscopic (-ˈsko-) adjective
with many changing colours, sights, impressions etc.
References in classic literature ?
It was marvellous, a feast for the eyes, this complication of coloured tints, a perfect kaleidoscope of green, yellow, orange, violet, indigo, and blue; in one word, the whole palette of an enthusiastic colourist
As for those antique floor-cloth & still occasionally seen in the dwellings of the rabble - cloths of huge, sprawling, and radiating devises, stripe-interspersed, and glorious with all hues, among which no ground is intelligible-these are but the wicked invention of a race of time-servers and money-lovers - children of Baal and worshippers of Mammon - Benthams, who, to spare thought and economize fancy, first cruelly invented the Kaleidoscope, and then established joint-stock companies to twirl it by steam.
But you couldn't make a man like Winsett see that; and that was why the New York of literary clubs and exotic restaurants, though a first shake made it seem more of a kaleidoscope, turned out, in the end, to be a smaller box, with a more monotonous pattern, than the assembled atoms of Fifth Avenue.
A man may be very sober--or at least firmly set upon his legs on that neutral ground which lies between the confines of perfect sobriety and slight tipsiness--and yet feel a strong tendency to mingle up present circumstances with others which have no manner of connection with them; to confound all consideration of persons, things, times, and places; and to jumble his disjointed thoughts together in a kind of mental kaleidoscope, producing combinations as unexpected as they are transitory.
Let the reader imagine all these grotesque figures of the Pont Neuf, those nightmares petrified beneath the hand of Germain Pilon, assuming life and breath, and coming in turn to stare you in the face with burning eyes; all the masks of the Carnival of Venice passing in succession before your glass,--in a word, a human kaleidoscope.
A change of ideas presented themselves to his brain, like a new design on the kaleidoscope.
But he swiftly dismissed the kaleidoscope of memory, oppressed by the urgent need of the present.
For three hours we strolled about together, watching the ever-changing kaleidoscope of life as it ebbs and flows through Fleet Street and the Strand.
Provided with a case of pencils, and some sheets of paper, I used to take a seat apart from them, near the window, and busy myself in sketching fancy vignettes, representing any scene that happened momentarily to shape itself in the ever-shifting kaleidoscope of imagination: a glimpse of sea between two rocks; the rising moon, and a ship crossing its disk; a group of reeds and water-flags, and a naiad's head, crowned with lotus-flowers, rising out of them; an elf sitting in a hedge-sparrow's nest, under a wreath of hawthorn- bloom
The childish and savage taste of men and women for new patterns keeps how many shaking and squinting through kaleidoscopes that they may discover the particular figure which this generation requires today.
Representing more than 20 artists, Kaleidoscope brings together artworks from the Arts Council Collection and other major UK collections.