kaolin

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ka·o·lin

also ka·o·line  (kā′ə-lĭn)
n.
A fine clay used in ceramics and refractories, as a filler or coating for paper and textiles, as an additive in food and toothpaste, and as an antidiarrheal drug.

[French, from Mandarin Gāolíng, a mountain of Jiangxi province.]

kaolin

(ˈkeɪəlɪn) or

kaoline

n
(Minerals) a fine white clay used for the manufacture of hard-paste porcelain and bone china and in medicine as a poultice and gastrointestinal absorbent. Also called: china clay
[C18: from French, from Chinese Kaoling Chinese mountain where supplies for Europe were first obtained, from kao high + ling hill]
ˌkaoˈlinic adj

ka•o•lin

or ka•o•line

(ˈkeɪ ə lɪn)

n.
a fine white clay used in the manufacture of porcelain.
[1720–30; < French < Chinese Gāolǐng mountain in Jiangxi province]
ka`o•lin′ic, adj.

ka·o·lin

(kā′ə-lĭn)
A soft, fine, whitish sedimentary rock made of clay minerals, especially kaolinite. Kaolin forms from the weathering of other rocks that are rich in aluminum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kaolin - a fine usually white clay formed by the weathering of aluminous minerals (as feldspar)kaolin - a fine usually white clay formed by the weathering of aluminous minerals (as feldspar); used in ceramics and as an absorbent and as a filler (e.g., in paper)
Kaopectate - trade name for a fixed-combination antidiarrheal drug that use kaolin as the adsorbent and pectin as the emollient
art paper - a high-quality paper (usually having a filler of china clay)
clay - a very fine-grained soil that is plastic when moist but hard when fired
Translations

kaolin

[ˈkeɪəlɪn] Ncaolín m

kaolin

nKaolin m or nt, → Porzellanerde f

kaolin

[ˈke/ɛ7əlɪn] ncaolino

ka·o·lin

n. caolín, silicato de aluminio hidratado, agente de cualidades absorbentes de uso interno y externo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus she has managed to overcome the supposed incompatibility between engobe slips and stoneware; and to combine antithetical ingredients in her kaolinic stoneware.
Physiological explanations do not disappear here; even these, however, stress not "addiction" but the advantageousness of earth-eating as an affordable and easy means of accessing important minerals, particularly during pregnancy, as well as soothing digestive symptoms (indeed, in the West, kaolinic clay has long formed an ingredient in preparations like Kaopectate).