kaput


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ka·put

also ka·putt  (kä-po͝ot′, -po͞ot′, kə-)
adj. Informal
Incapacitated or destroyed.

[German kaputt, from French capot, not having won a single trick at piquet, perhaps from French dialectal caper, to look at on the sly, knit the brows, from French cape, cape (as in sous cape, on the sly, secretly (literally, under the cape)), from Provençal capa, from Late Latin cappa.]

kaput

(kæˈpʊt)
adj
(postpositive) informal ruined, broken, or not functioning
[C20: from German kaputt done for, from French être capot to have made no tricks (literally: to be hoodwinked), from capot hooded cloak]

ka•put

(kɑˈpʊt, -ˈput, kə-)

adj. Slang.
1. ruined; done for; demolished.
2. unable to operate or continue; broken: The TV went kaput.
[1890–95; < German: orig. trickless (in game of piquet) < French (être) capot (to be) without tricks, i.e., make zero score]

kaput

A German word meaning done for, used to mean broken, destroyed, or out of order.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.kaput - destroyed or killed; "we are gone geese"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
destroyed - spoiled or ruined or demolished; "war left many cities destroyed"; "Alzheimer's is responsible for her destroyed mind"

kaput

adjective (Informal) broken, finished, dead, destroyed, ruined, wrecked, undone, extinct, defunct, dead in the water (informal) His film career was kaput.

kaput

adjective
Informal. No longer effective, capable, or valuable:
Idioms: at the end of the line, over the hill, past one's prime.
Translations

kaput

[kəˈpʊt] ADJ
1. [object] → kaput
to be kaputestar kaput
2. [organization] now he's dead the whole company is kaputahora que ha fallecido, la empresa se ha ido al traste

kaput

[kəˈpʊt] adjkapout inv, HS inv(= hors service)
to be kaput → être kapout, être HS
The washing machine seems to be kaput → La machine à laver a l'air kapout or HS.

kaput

adj (inf)kaputt (inf)

kaput

[kəˈput] adj (fam) → kaputt inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Borrowed words or loan words taken from other languages and at least partly naturalized are acceptable, such as adios, amigo, senor, soju, kaput, bambino and ramen as long as they are within your chosen reference source guideline.
I am going to settle down with him' and that went kaput.
Trondheim is celebrated for his Kaput & Zosky and Donjon series, among others, as well as being a founder of French independent publisher L'Association.
Chosen to be developed as a Smart City, Kakinada has a strong Kaput community existence where an agitation for Other Backward Class (OBC) status for Kapus is going on for past one year.
In late February, Miller, a Republican, announced an emergency state rule change allowing the use of the warfarin-based poison Kaput, which was recently approved by the Environmental Protection Agency to kill wild pigs.
Summary: Dubai woman's baking plans go kaput after she finds creepy crawlies inside sealed packet bought well within expiry date at a supermarket
An emerging body of research on early algebra has provided important evidence regarding children's abilities to think algebraically (Cai & Knuth, 2011; Carraher & Schliemann, 2007; Kaput, Carraher, & Blanton, 2008; Lins & Kaput, 2004).
And, that quickly, hopes for a new kind of devolution, of taking on new powers and seeing how we like them, of accepting responsibility for raising more of our taxes and how we spend them, can go kaput.
My dictionary says that the word kaput comes originally from French, not German as I always thought.
Predictability, portfolio positioned to bet against American equities and the US dollar are now kaput.
Early Algebra is Not the Same as Algebra Early, J Kaput, D.
It's conclusion is simple: capitalism is kaput, revolution is the only solution.