karst

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karst

 (kärst)
n.
An area of irregular limestone in which erosion has produced fissures, sinkholes, underground streams, and caverns.

[German, after the Karst, a limestone plateau near Trieste (where geologists first studied karstic landscapes) .]

karst′ic adj.

karst

(kɑːst)
n
(Physical Geography) (modifier) denoting the characteristic scenery of a limestone region, including underground streams, gorges, etc
[C19: German, from Karst, limestone plateau near Trieste]
ˈkarstic adj

karst

(kɑrst)

n.
an area of limestone terrane characterized by sinks, ravines, and underground streams.
[1900–05; < German, generic use of Karst, name of limestone plateau N of Trieste]
karst′ic, adj.

karst

Limestone landscape with a largely bare, rocky surface and rivers that flow through underground caves.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In the carbonate reservoir the well found a 25 metres gross gas column above a 75 metres gross oil column in karstified and dolomitized limestone.
The loess cover, however, is not always uniform, particularly in the upper parts of valley slopes where underlying karstified limestone can be exposed at the surface.
It shows a karstified volcanic landscape filmed on the island of La Reunion; planted amid the detritus is a gray flag waving in the wind and flapping about like a long tail.
Silicification here is contingent upon the availability of a suitable host substrate, namely karstified calcrete, because in its absence, new clay minerals are more likely to form from excess aqueous silica in more alluvial soils.
Resistivity depth-sounding was carried outside of known karstified fracture zones to study resistivity patterns in a normal geological vertical section.
Wesley Chapel Gulf lies in the Mitchell Plateau (formerly the Mitchell Plain of Malott [1922]) physiographic province, a non-glaciated and karstified region developed on Mississippian limestone bedrock that has numerous sinkholes, blind valleys, swallow holes, and caves (Gray 2000).