karyolysis


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Related to karyolysis: necrosis, karyorrhexis

karyolysis

(ˌkærɪˈɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Biology) cytology the disintegration of a cell nucleus, which occurs on death of the cell
[C20: from Greek, from karyon a nut + -lysis]
karyolytic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.karyolysis - disintegration and dissolution of a cell nucleus when a cell dies
lysis - (biochemistry) dissolution or destruction of cells such as blood cells or bacteria
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

kar·y·ol·y·sis

n. cariólisis, disolución del núcleo de una célula.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Renal Cells Nuclear Alterations: Some renal cells in the lining epithelia of the proximal convoluted tubule of NPs-treated rats demonstrated karyorrhexis or/and karyolysis (Fig.
Upon microscopic examination, the rumen and reticulum exhibited moderate and multifocal areas of hydropic degeneration of the epithelium, characterized by the formation of intracytoplasmic vacuoles (Figure 1B), as well as extensive areas of necrosis of the mucosa epithelium, characterized by nuclei in karyorrhexis and karyolysis, as well as hypereosinophilia and loss of cytoplasmic limits of keratinocytes.
During the process of changes post-death, under the influence of own enzymes, the disintegration of muscular fibers and karyolysis was observed.
In addition, nuclear changes, karyolysis, and a reduction in the number of islet cells were observed (reduced number of cells per zone).
The sections from the ventral face of the rabbit's tongue using the diode laser (810, 940, and 980 nm) showed a similar thermal denaturation, such as carbonization, characterized histologically by degradation vacuoles, pyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis, and elongation of nuclei at the edges of the incisions (Figure 2).
This is because of pyknosis of the [beta]-cell nuclei which undergo karyolysis. In the present study, alloxan given in a dose of 120 mg/kg b.w i.p was found to be optimal for inducing stable and consistent diabetes in Wistar rats and caused a lower incidence of death.
They were observed for Nuclear abnormalities like Karyolysis (KL), Karyorrhexis (KR), Binucleated egg (BN) under bright field Nikon microscope under 10 x 100 magnifications.
Photomicrographs of hematoxylin and eosin stained histological section of (a) normal liver, (b) C[Cl.sub.4]-treated animals showing variable degrees of vacuolar degeneration, (c) C[Cl.sub.4]-treated animals showing widened sinusoids, active proliferated Von kupffer cells, (d) C[Cl.sub.4]-treated animals showing necrotic changes in the form of severe destruction of hepatocytes or karyolysis, (e) C[Cl.sub.4]-treated animals showing leucocytic infiltration in the portal area and hepatic parenchyma, (f) C[Cl.sub.4]-kefir treated animal showing much less damages in the hepatic parenchyma, more or less normal hepatocytes, and (g) C[Cl.sub.4]-kefir treated animal showing very mild vacuolar degeneration with no evidence of necrosis, mild congestion and no inflammatory changes
Cellular debris of necrotic beta cells appeared as eosinophilic smudges and necrotic changes in nuclei like pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis were observed.
Figure 2d showed a mouse treated with acetaminophen with extensive centrilobular necrosis, hydropic degeneration of hepatocytes, destruction of central vein endothelium, karyolysis, pyknosis, and karyorrhexis of nuclei.
(h) Hyperaemia in the glomeruli capillaries, congestion (arrows) in renal tubular interstitium, degeneration of renal tubular epithelial cells presenting swelling, karyopyknosis, and karyolysis, and reddish material (arrows) exuded in lumen renal tubulars.
Moreover, in irradiated cells, the presence of damaged cells with karyorrhexis and karyolysis was observed as well as an increase in the number of giant cells as a consequence of damage induced by radiation treatments (Figures 10(b), 10(c), and 10(d)).