keep pace


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keep

 (kēp)
v. kept, keep·ing, keeps
v.tr.
1. To retain possession of: kept the change; must keep your composure.
2. To have as a supply: keep spare parts in case of emergency.
3.
a. To provide (a family, for example) with maintenance and support: "There's little to earn and many to keep" (Charles Kingsley).
b. To support (a mistress or lover) financially.
4. To put customarily; store: Where do you keep your saw?
5.
a. To supply with room and board for a charge: keep boarders.
b. To raise: keep chickens.
6. To maintain for use or service: an urbanite who didn't keep a car.
7. To manage, tend, or have charge of: Keep the shop while I'm away.
8. To preserve (food).
9. To cause to continue in a state, condition, or course of action: tried to keep the patient calm.
10.
a. To maintain records or entries in: keep a yearly diary.
b. To enter (data) in a book: keep financial records.
11.
a. To detain: was kept after school.
b. To restrain: kept the child away from the stove; kept the crowd back with barriers.
c. To prevent or deter: tried to keep the ice from melting.
d. To refrain from divulging: keep a secret.
e. To save; reserve: keep extra money for emergencies.
12. To adhere or conform to; follow: keep late hours.
13. To be faithful to; fulfill: keep one's word.
14. To celebrate; observe: keep the Sabbath.
v.intr.
1. To remain in a state or condition; stay: keep in line; keep quiet; kept well.
2. To continue to do: keep on talking; keep guessing.
3. To remain fresh or unspoiled: The dessert won't keep.
4. To restrain oneself; hold oneself back: I couldn't keep from eavesdropping.
n.
1. Care; charge: The child is in my keep for the day.
2. The means by which one is supported: earn one's keep.
3.
a. The stronghold of a castle.
b. A jail.
Phrasal Verbs:
keep at
To persevere in work or an action.
keep down
1. To prevent from growing, accomplishing, or succeeding: keep the revolutionaries down.
2. To hold under control or at a reduced level: Keep your voice down.
3. To refrain from vomiting: Although seasick, I managed to keep my food down.
keep off
To stay away from.
keep to
To adhere to: keep to the original purpose.
keep up
1. To maintain in good condition: kept up the property.
2. To persevere in; carry on: We asked her to stop talking, but she kept it up. To preserve or sustain: kept up the appearance of friendship.
3. To continue at the same level or pace: The snow kept up all day.
4. To continue to pay off (a financial obligation).
5. To match one's competitors, colleagues, or neighbors in success or lifestyle: couldn't keep up with his friends who went into business.
6. To remain adequately informed: loved to keep up on the gossip.
Idioms:
for keeps
1. For an indefinitely long period: gave the ring to me for keeps.
2. Seriously and permanently: We're separating for keeps.
keep an eye on
1. To watch over attentively; mind.
2. To watch closely or carefully: keep your eye on the ball.
keep an eye out
To be watchful.
keep a stiff upper lip
To be courageous or stoic in the face of adversity.
keep company
1. To carry on a courtship: a couple who kept company but never married.
2. To socialize or associate: keeps company with some tough thugs.
keep (one's) chin up
To be stalwart, courageous, or optimistic in the face of difficulty.
keep (one's) eyes open/peeled
To be on the lookout.
keep (one's) nose clean Informal
To stay out of trouble.
keep pace
To stay even with others, as in a contest.
keep (someone) company
To accompany or remain with.
keep the wolf from the door
To avoid the privation and suffering resulting from a lack of money: Both spouses had to work in order to keep the wolf from the door.
keep time
1. To indicate the correct time.
2. Music To maintain the tempo or rhythm.
keep to (oneself)
1. To shun the company of others: She kept to herself all morning.
2. To refrain from divulging: He kept the news to himself.

[Middle English kepen, from Old English cēpan, to observe, seize.]
Synonyms: keep, retain, withhold, reserve
These verbs mean to have and maintain in one's possession or control. Keep is the most general: We received a few offers but decided to keep the house. Retain means to continue to hold, especially in the face of possible loss: Though unhappy, he retained his sense of humor. Withhold implies reluctance or refusal to give, grant, or allow: The tenant withheld his rent until the owner fixed the boiler. To reserve is to hold back for the future or for a special purpose: The farmer reserved two acres for an orchard. See Also Synonyms at observe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.keep pace - maintain the same pace; "The child cannot keep step with his big brother"
keep up - maintain a required pace or level; "He could not keep up and dropped out of the race"
References in classic literature ?
So I redoubled my efforts to keep pace with the hunt; but I might as well have attempted to distance the bird upon the wing; as I have often reminded you, I am no runner.
What were the thoughts of his strange captor or guide Clayton could only vaguely conjecture; but that he had heard the shot, and was in some manner affected by it was quite evident, for he quickened his pace so appreciably that Clayton, stumbling blindly in his wake, was down a dozen times in as many minutes in a vain effort to keep pace with him, and soon was left hopelessly behind.
The Vigilance bands that had at first shot plunderers very freely were now either entirely dispersed by the plague, or busy between town and cemetery in a vain attempt to keep pace with it.
Her little pile of letters had grown, and if a look of determination was compatible with her fair and slightly faded beauty the habit of attending to her business could always keep pace with any excursion of her thought.
Her limbs were indeed full of strength and agility, and, as her mind was no less animated with spirit, she was perfectly able to keep pace with her nimble lover.
In this manner they had not proceeded far when they met a company of women and children: "Why, you lazy old fellow," cried several tongues at once, "how can you ride upon the beast, while that poor little lad there can hardly keep pace by the side of you?
Federal employees and all working people deserve to be compensated fairly for their work, and that includes wages and salaries that at least keep pace with rising living costs.
Summary: Journalists in the UAE have been urged to keep pace with the developments in the global media to keep attracting audiences.
SMALL businesses are failing to keep pace with new technology and could be jeopardising their future success, according to research from Lloyds TSB Business and the Open University's Small Enterprise Research Team.
The DAV must keep pace with advances in information technology in order to maintain its preeminent position as an advocate for America's disabled veterans.
To base one's calculations on an expectation that wage-earners will continue to receive pay rises that fail to keep pace with the cost of living is as cynical as it is depressing.
SANTA CLARITA -- Los Angeles and Ventura counties have a serious shortage of housing, continuing a long trend of housing production failing to keep pace with demand, according to a study released Monday by an industry group and the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp.