keister

(redirected from keesters)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

keis·ter

 (kē′stər)
n. Slang
1. The buttocks.
2. The anus.

[Earlier, satchel, suitcase, ultimately from German Kiste, box, case (also buttocks, anus, in German slang), from Middle High German, box, case, from Old High German kista, from Latin cista; see chest.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

keister

(ˈkiːstə) or

keester

n
1. the rump; buttocks
2. a suitcase, trunk, or box
[C20: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

keis•ter

or kees•ter

(ˈki stər)

n. Slang.
the buttocks; rump.
[1880–85; earlier, as argot, handbag, suitcase, safe; of obscure orig.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.keister - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit onkeister - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?"
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
torso, trunk, body - the body excluding the head and neck and limbs; "they moved their arms and legs and bodies"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

keister

n (US inf)
(= buttocks)Hintern m (inf)
(rare: = case) → Koffer m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Tony Walton's spare hut haunting set makes the place a holy sanctuary, dominated by Casey Stengel's desk and the spirits of all the dearly and not-so-dearly departed managers who ever parked their keesters on his leather chair.
While I know that they, like me, are up to their keesters in alligators, they'd best remember to also worry about draining the swamp.