kerel

kerel

(ˈkerəl)
n
South African a chap or fellow
[C19: Afrikaans]
References in periodicals archive ?
Liesbet het op die ouderdom van vyftien 'n seksuele verhouding met haar ma se kerel, Gary, gehad wat noodlottig geeindig het.
De Haan (1935:563), who researched British personnel during British rule over Java, wrote that Hare was not an evil fellow ("kwade kerel") and, as we have seen, commented favorably on Hare's complaints about the condition in which the convicts were delivered to be transported to Borneo and his alarm if they were to be treated harshly by the Dutch when sent back to Java.
Syntactically, it behaves, differently though, as the negation marker is placed before ka: na ka kerel "he will not do" (Boretzky 2003:68).
kerel 'to do, make' < OIA karoti 'does' (2814)--compare the conjugation of Indus Kohistani karav 'to do' which displays "irregular" variations of the vowel e.g.
For something a little different, try using some pepper ed smoked mac kerel fillets.
Die eerste fragment uit Liewe/beste Maans wemel van die snaaksighede.Die gebeure draai om Dot en haar ma, tant Bella, se voorbereidings vir die koms van eersgenoemde se kerel, Arthur Drew.
de Francois Kerel. Paris: Gallimard ("Folio"), 1989.
The island, which is 18km long and 5-10km wide, also has some stunning beaches such as Port Donnant or Port Kerel where we all swam and lazed around for the afternoon, before heading back on the ferry and to the pool table in Le Bono.
Jeanne Kerel worked for the National Center of Scientific Research in Paris and was at the London School of Economics writing her doctoral thesis on "The Cost of Living in Paris 1840-1954" when she met a young man who not only had brains and charm but, more to the point, spoke fluent French.