kerosene lamp


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kerosene lamp - a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for lightkerosene lamp - a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light
lamp - an artificial source of visible illumination
lamp chimney, chimney - a glass flue surrounding the wick of an oil lamp
Davy lamp, safety lamp - an oil lamp that will not ignite flammable gases (methane)
wick, taper - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame
Translations

kerosene lamp

References in classic literature ?
His face, by the full ray of the kerosene lamp, changed and darkened, and Kim, used as every beggar must be to watching countenances, took good note.
The kerosene lamps above flung high lights from the rash of sweat on his forehead.
Daylight leaned back in his chair and gazed up at the kerosene lamps while he computed aloud.
One evening in July, when the transient guests who made the New Willard House their temporary home had become scarce, and the hallways, lighted only by kerosene lamps turned low, were plunged in gloom, Elizabeth Willard had an adventure.
At nightfall he ran into Teddy's nursery to watch how kerosene lamps were lighted, and when Teddy went to bed Rikki-tikki climbed up too.
The lantern provides ten times the light output of a kerosene lamp and five hours of light when it is fully charged, as well as enough power for a radio.
The first consequence of this was that kerosene could be obtained in great quantities from petroleum, and the kerosene lamp became almost universal in the United States and elsewhere.
But suddenly somebody barged into the house that Ning was able to recognize as Gaspar because they still had a lighted kerosene lamp at the corner of the house, bright enough to illuminate the whole house so that she could nurse their four-month-old youngest child.
"As per investigation, the mother used a kerosene lamp to light their tent while feeding her three-month old baby," the BFP said.
Arson investigators have been told that a kerosene lamp might have caused the fire.
In addition, unlike the cocktail of aerosol particles released by cookstoves and cooking fires, the dark curls rising from a kerosene lamp are nearly pure black carbon.
A family in Rwanda using Nuru Light to light their home, instead of kerosene, would spend about $7 a year to recharge the light, while spending $118 annually to fill their kerosene lamp. Even factoring in the cost of buying the