kerygmatic


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kerygmatic

(ˌkerɪɡˈmætɪk)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity formal belonging or relating to preaching
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
preach the kerygmatic Word but maliciously contributed to the doctrine
Indeed, Rudolf Bultman, the leading kerygmatic theologian, argued the only essential historical teaching is the crucifixion of Jesus: all else is conjecture and interpretation.
Muse seems to this reviewer to write in a manner that seeks to effect kerygmatic movement in his audience--that is, he asks his readers to experience an inner change in order to engage and metabolize his writing.
(12) 'Kerygmatic inflection' is invoked in brackets in the context of assessing the degree of stylisation which separates the hagiographical account from historical reality in Van Uytfanghe 1993, 148.
Karl Barth's theology was church dogmatics; Rudolf Bultmann's theology was kerygmatic theology.
He characterizes Francis's theology as basically kerygmatic, one that includes the strong influence of the 19th-century theologian Karl Christian Friedrich Krause's "democratic romanticism." He sees Francis not as a covert Franciscan, but as a Jesuit through and through, especially in his appeal to the Ignatian discernment of spirits.
He covers theotopy, 50 shades of gray, synaesthetic space: space and light, kerygmatic space: word and image, eucharistic space: dance and garden, and the place of the spirit.
Jesus spoke about God's empowerment of his followers but often did so in a kerygmatic or an evangelistic context.
The use of case studies further prompts students to think contextually about the pastoral, catechetical, and kerygmatic ramifications of the beliefs and practices presented.
While proclamation of the Christian message has priority, we cannot address people's concerns in a scientific world entirely with kerygmatic preaching but must do some teaching to inculcate familiarity with adequate ways of relating science and Christian thought.
The movement of meaning circumventing through the community, through the texts that speak of a Transcendent reality, is placed "in front" of the believer--through others that have come before him or her--as a choice: to let oneself be transformed by the kerygmatic power of the faith through the poetic character of the kerygma itself and, in this sense, allow a radical orientation of one's life in relation to the narrative of the particular religion.