khanga


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khanga

(ˈkæŋɡə)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a variant spelling of kanga
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Beaded garments from the Ndebele and the Zulu of South Africa were followed by the famous cotton Khanga, Kitenge and Kikoi textiles from Kenya.
The same applies to the cotton Khanga, which was imported for centuries from India and other sources and the 'lesos' that Muslim Malagasy and Coastal Kenyan women sewed together from handkerchiefs exposing only their eyes, grew into the market we know today as Khangas (from the word in English 'Guinea Fowl' as most of the early Khangas had a spotted or dotted border or interior) with political and other slogans incorporated into the design.
A young lady emerged from the outhouse with a yellow-green khanga wrapped around her torso.
Le 20 mai 1973, un groupe de combattants sahraouis avait decide d'attaquer le poste espagnol d'El Khanga, a l'est de la ville de Smara.
Amanda Khanga has joined Visit Bentonville as meeting and sales manager.
According to the notice issued by the company here Thursday, power supply from Ahmad Nagar, Waris Pura, Barkat Pura, al-Masoom and Niamoana feeders emanating from 132-KV Sammundri Road grid station and Bismillah Pur feeder originating from 132-KV Factory Area grid station will remain suspended from 7am to 12 noon while Kundian, Khanga Sirajian and Wapda Colony feeders emanating from 66-KV Chashma grid station will observe shutdown from 6am to 10am on Saturday (April 22).
The company started supplying Khanga and Kitanga printed fabrics to African countries like Sudan Kenya and Tanzenia during the Second World War.
In the city itself, Ms Yumi Nakano, an energetic young lady who runs a coffee shop, had organised a number of the female tsunami victims to make obis (these are the elaborate belts won by both men and women over the traditional Japanese dress, the yukata) using, to my surprise and delight, from khanga and kitenge material purchased in Tanzania through fair-trade deals.
Women write messages on the khangas and then choose to wear one khanga or another as a way of communicating messages and identity.