khanga

(redirected from khangas)

khanga

(ˈkæŋɡə)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a variant spelling of kanga
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The same applies to the cotton Khanga, which was imported for centuries from India and other sources and the 'lesos' that Muslim Malagasy and Coastal Kenyan women sewed together from handkerchiefs exposing only their eyes, grew into the market we know today as Khangas (from the word in English 'Guinea Fowl' as most of the early Khangas had a spotted or dotted border or interior) with political and other slogans incorporated into the design.
This is still a thriving industry with khangas coming from many sources, and still being worn mostly at the Coast.
Artworks, carvings, jewellery, besides other craftworks were on display .The exclusive items include beaded ornaments, footwear, baskets, masks, khangas, maasai leso and others which showcased African craftsmanship.
Women write messages on the khangas and then choose to wear one khanga or another as a way of communicating messages and identity.
At the heart of the story are Khangas grandparents Oliver Golden, a Black American agronomist trained by George Washington Carver at Tuskegee Institute, and Bertha Bialek, a Polish Jewish immigrant.
YELENA Khanga recalls the day in February 1991 when she ran her fingers through the rich soil of a farm once owned by her great-grandfather in Yazoo County, Miss.
"I always believed that the only relatives I had were my mother and my grandmother," 30-year-old Khanga says with a distinctly Russian accent.
There was also a section which was dedicated to Tanzanian items including khangas, clothes, ornaments, miniatures, among others.
The items are all hand-made, which include artworks, carvings and jewellery, besides, beaded ornaments, footwear, sculptures, kitchenware, bracelets, necklaces, key holders, baskets, masks, khangas, and others, showcasing authentic African craftsmanship.
The items on display included Tanzanian khangas and Kitenge, batik, handmade beaded frames, banana leaf artworks, attractive beaded coasters as well as stunning accessories such as bags, clutches, sandals, bracelets, necklaces, bowls, key chains, besides others, all depicting the unique African beauty.
A[yen] In the project, Fatma mostly enjoys the batiks and khangas. According to her, the works on the batiks give the history and traditions and the attraction sites of Tanzania.