kidology

kidology

(kɪˈdɒlədʒɪ)
n
informal Brit the art or practice of bluffing or deception
[C20: from kid2 + ology]
Translations

kidology

[kɪˈdɒlədʒɪ] N (Brit) → guasa f

kidology

n (inf: = bluffing) → Bluff m (inf)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Six months ago, the headline on this column read: "Sturgeon ends kidology about second independence referendum".
Clough decided some kidology was needed to solve the problem and treated the visit of Bristol City like an away game.
Whatever, principal businesses still seek the top 0.5% of clever people to fill their most senior posts, and no amount of kidology will stop that.
Paul Robinson is wary of the Steve Bruce's kidology - and Villa's quality.
Moeen still prefers to be known as 'a batsman who bowls a bit', and Root and coach Trevor Bayliss have seen the value of indulging him with what the new captain refers to as "kidology".
Although there was an element of kidology from McClaren, who wanted to look at other captaincy options, United insist Coloccini REMAINS skipper.
Cook sensed a hint of pre-match kidology in his opposite number's words but expects Anderson, England's leading Test wicket-taker, to respond in style to any inferences against him.
Players get to know how a manager operates and behaves, the kidology he uses and what he is all about.
Williams' constant insistence that the calendar slam drive is just a sideshow has been textbook kidology, designed as much to fend off constant questioning as to balance her growing excitement.
Marler is a big hit JOE MARLER insists he won't be taken in by Lions prop Adam Jones' kidology - or taken down when England's first scrum smashes into Wales.
O'Connell laughed it off as Aussie kidology back in June and said Ireland must do likewise this weekend.