killer whale


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killer whale

n.
See orca.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

killer whale

n
(Animals) a predatory black-and-white toothed whale, Orcinus orca, with a large erect dorsal fin, most common in cold seas: family Delphinidae. Also called: killer, grampus or orc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

kill′er whale′


n.
a large, predatory, black-and-white dolphin, Orcinus orca.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

kill·er whale

(kĭl′ər)
See orca.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.killer whale - predatory black-and-white toothed whale with large dorsal finkiller whale - predatory black-and-white toothed whale with large dorsal fin; common in cold seas
dolphin - any of various small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
genus Orcinus, Orcinus - killer whales
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
الحوت الأبيَض والأسْوَد
косатка
kosatka
dræberhval
miekkavalas
kardszárnyú delfin
háhyrningur
orka
baleia-assassina
kosatka dravá
späckhuggare
katil balina

killer whale

norca
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

whale

(weil) noun
a type of very large mammal that lives in the sea.
killer whale noun
a black and white whale.
ˈwhalebone noun, adjective
(of) a light bendable substance got from the upper jaw of certain whales.
whale oil
oil obtained from the fatty parts of a whale.
have a whale of a time
to enjoy oneself very much.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
You look as though you had been fighting with the Killer Whale."
Now and then he would see a thin fin, like a big shark's fin, drifting along close to shore, and he knew that that was the Killer Whale, the Grampus, who eats young seals when he can get them; and Kotick would head for the beach like an arrow, and the fin would jig off slowly, as if it were looking for nothing at all.
"The Killer Whale himself could not have cut them up worse.
You mustn't swim till you're six weeks old, Or your head will be sunk by your heels; And summer gales and Killer Whales Are bad for baby seals.
A KILLER whale attacking a group of dolphins was witnessed off the coast of West Cork in what experts say is a very rare occurrence in Irish waters.
The killer whale: most of us are familiar with these predators that lurk beneath our Earth's seas in either frigid or tropical temperatures.
WASHINGTON -- For decades, there were tales from fishermen and tourists, even lots of photos, of a mysterious killer whale that just didn't look like all the others, but scientists had never seen one.
PAYING no attention to nearby divers, a killer whale and her calf hunting for food frolic in a snowy Norwegian fjord.
Overfishing and man-made noise may also affect the health of the animals, but PCBs particularly can have a dramatic effect on the reproduction and immune system of the killer whales, said a team of researchers Aarhus University, who found that the number of Orca or killer whales is rapidly declining in 10 out of the 19 killer whale populations investigated.
Overfishing and manmade noise may also affect the health of the animals, but PCBs particularly can have a dramatic effect on the reproduction and immune system of the killer whales, said a team of researchers Aarhus University, who found that the number of Orca or killer whales is rapidly declining in 10 out of the 19 killer whale populations investigated.
Killer whale populations in Alaska, Norway, Antarctica and the Arctic among other places, where chemical levels are lower, will probably continue to grow and thrive, the study found.