kilocycle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to kilocycle: kilocycle per second

kil·o·cy·cle

 (kĭl′ə-sī′kəl)
n. Abbr. kc
Kilohertz.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kilocycle

(ˈkɪləʊˌsaɪkəl)
n
(Units) short for kilocycle per second: a former unit of frequency equal to 1 kilohertz
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

kil•o•hertz

(ˈkɪl əˌhɜrts)

n., pl. -hertz, -hertz•es.
a unit of frequency, equal to 1000 cycles per second. Abbr.: kHz Formerly, kilocycle.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kilocycle - one thousand periods per second
cycle per second, cycles/second, hertz, Hz, cps, cycle - the unit of frequency; one hertz has a periodic interval of one second
Mc, megacycle, megacycle per second, megahertz, MHz - one million periods per second
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

kilocycle

[ˈkɪləʊˌsaɪkl] Nkilociclo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

kilocycle

nKilohertz nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
There were invented words, such as "kilocycle," and borrowed ones, such as "broadcast"--taken from agriculture, Sapoznik explains, where it referred to the casting of seeds in a field.
[10.sup.3]-[10.sup.5] kilocycle fatigue observed in the presence of relatively small macroplastic deformations in a failure zone at macroscopic level;
The second history of wcFL amounted to struggles for a clear broadcast signal, one unencumbered by competing signals in the kilocycle range and permission to increase its power to 50,000 watts.
In 1954, a Class D daytime-only AM radio station signed on the air at 1380 Kilocycles, with 1,000 watts of power.
Indeed, NRL radio researchers--pioneers in the use of the more cantankerous radio frequencies of 1,300 kilocycles and higher--made do without a number of instruments that would be ubiquitous by the 1940s.