kinesic


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Related to kinesic: proxemics

ki·ne·sics

 (kə-nē′sĭks, -zĭks, kī-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of nonlinguistic bodily movements, such as gestures and facial expressions, as a systematic mode of communication.

[From Greek kīnēsis, movement; see kinesis.]

ki·ne′sic (-sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

kinesic

(kɪˈniːsɪk)
adj
(Linguistics) of or relating to kinesics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Describing how poetic works, plays, and devotional treatises target readers' kinesic intelligence--their ability to understand movements and gestures--she demonstrates the theological implications of clothing, often evinced by how garments limit or facilitate the movements and postures of bodies in narratives.
As an instance of Tribble's method, take this sentence: 'All of the movement arts that actors had to master--gesture, walking, swordplay and dance--are intimately linked to the development of a distinctive kinesic intelligence that could on the one hand emulate the elite and on the other hand descry a range of postures, body types and social classes' (115).
In this way semantic roles become as intrinsic to a specific dramatic interpretation as the kinesic and pictorial codes of the performance.
Language and paralanguage both involve a kinesic element.
The top four hurtful kinesic behaviors were getting into a person's face/space, turning away of the head, throwing objects at the wall or ground, and slamming doors or other objects with force.
A third prediction is that kinesic and paralinguistic systems influence the comprehension and modulate the production of language.
Purpose--to optimize the recovery from Achilles tendon rupture by kinesic means.
These artists, many of whom use different media, deal with topics such as the relationship between people and their environment, identity linked to certain kinesic trends such as changing hair-styling in African women depending on regions, the life of African colonialists, etc.
For Guillemette Bolens, we read with our bodies, in a sense, or at least with the knowledge of our bodies; that is to say, with our 'kinesic intelligence', defined by Ellen Spolsky as 'our human capacity to discern and interpret body movements, body postures, gestures, and facial expressions in real situations as well as in our reception of visual art' (p.
In fact, this impression of contented relaxation is maintained by Cohen's kinesic choices throughout the sequence.
gestures (kinesics): while hand and arm are the most efficient transmitters of kinesic information, the feet and head position are also important;