kinetophone


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kinetophone

an apparatus for projecting sound and pictures by a combination of a phonograph and a kinetoscope.
See also: Media
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Academic researchers often treat sound recording less as a current practice and more as a part of the history of film and cinema--for example, in the use of Edison's Kinetophone in 1895 in The Dickson Experimental Sound Film and the far-afield electroacoustic practices that famously created the "ancient music of the Krell" for the 1965 film Forbidden Planet.
TB: The earliest piece in the series is The Dickson Experimental Sound Film [1894 or 1895], a picture that is significant to film history because it's the only surviving film made specifically for the kinetophone, but that's just one part of the story.
Historians of film sound can trace audience reactions to the failed try-out of Edison's Kinetophone in 1913, an early effort to mechanically synchronise sound to image that ironically received many rave reviews from managers.
2008) (chronicling the speed of the early evolution of motion-picture projectors, from the kinetoscope to the vitascope, and finally the kinetophone, a device that combined film and phonograph).
Kinetophone Records will be hosting a free six-day experience of video installations, audio-visual performances, film screenings and AV workshops.
1895, Edison launched the Kinetophone, a device which loosely
The first chapter of this section discusses numerous American and European film-and-music technologies, from Edison's 1895 Kinetophone to the development of synchronized-sound systems by Lee de Forest, the Tri-Ergon laboratories, and Western Electric, in the mid-1920s.
Bringing the Chronophone to the US quickly led to antagonism with Thomas Edison, who was promoting his inferior Kinetophone system, and the ensuing court battles meant that the Flushing studio languished.