kinetoscope

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Related to kinetoscopes: kinetophone

ki·net·o·scope

 (kĭ-nĕt′ə-skōp′, -nē′tə-)
n.
An early device for viewing motion pictures, consisting of a case inside which a loop of film passes in front of an electric light, producing moving images that can be viewed through an opening in the case.

[Originally a trademark.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kinetoscope

(kɪˈnɛtəˌskəʊp; kɪˈniːtəˌskəʊp; kaɪˈnɛtəˌskəʊp; kaɪˈniːtəˌskəʊp)
n
(Film) an early type of film projector, developed in the late 19th century, which could project photographs so as to give the impression of movement
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

kinetoscope

an early apparatus for producing a moving picture. See also instruments. Cf. kinetophone.
See also: Media
an instrument for illustrating different combinations of kinematic curves. See also media.
See also: Instruments
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Kinetoscope - a device invented by Edison that gave an impression of movement as an endless loop of film moved continuously over a light source with a rapid shutter; precursor of the modern motion picture
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
brand, brand name, marque, trade name - a name given to a product or service
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It was to him, with his splendid power of vision, like gazing into a kinetoscope. He was both onlooker and participant.
The chapter on Blake and film emphasizes the wordplay of "moving pictures" to characterize Blake's art and features close readings of stills from Guy Brenton's 1958 film The Vision of William Blake, but what of all the earlier stages of film history (magic lantern shows, zoopraxiscopes, kinetoscopes, etc.) that Blake equally well might illuminate (and vice versa)?
Chicago, Johnson's hometown, upheld the ban citing its consistency with "the 1907 ordinance forbidding 'obscene and immoral kinetoscopes and cinematographs'" (Strieble 230).