References in classic literature ?
Perhaps it is only by a kink in my nature, strong in me even in those days, that I felt in such an existence, the share of the great majority, something amiss.
"A single kink in my brain," Thomson continued, "a secret weakness, perhaps even a dash of lunacy, and I might be quite reasonably the master-spy of the world.
There was not a soul for any of them to talk to except small farmers or fishermen; there were long winter evenings when the wind blew, whistling drearily through the leafless trees, and all around they saw nothing but the bare monotony of ploughed fields; and there was poverty, and there was lack of any work that seemed to matter; every kink in their characters had free play; there was nothing to restrain them; they grew narrow and eccentric: Philip knew all this, but in his young intolerance he did not offer it as an excuse.
Its Literature and Art have what one might call the kink of the unseen about them, and this persists even through decadence and affectation.
I tore myself out of it in such a hurry that I gave myself a kink in the neck.
"You'll die if I do, that's the kink of it," said Haley,--"no!" And he turned on his heel.
And I suppose he might have broken his neck by falling out of bed, if he got in an awkward kink. But for the life of me I can't imagine how the two things occurred.
To this day, then, that sudden kink in the straight line across the upper pasture remains a mystery to Sophie and George.
When she returned at three o'clock, her cheeks were a bright, pretty pink, and her hair, blown by the damp wind, had fluffed into kinks and curls wherever the loosened pins had given leave.
Oh, there were no kinks in it, any more than were there kinks in the hair of her entire genealogy.
"You'd make a good soap-boxer," Tom commended, "if only you'd get the kinks straightened out in your reasoning."
Auh!" He bent backward and forward stiffly from the hips to get the kinks out of himself.