kirk session


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kirk session

n
(Protestantism) the lowest court of the Presbyterian Church
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
CALDERHEAD ERSKINE CHURCH The Kirk session has now appointed Rev Iain Murdoch as locum minister for Calderhead Erskine Parish Church.
ST COLUMBA'S CHURCH Kirk Session meets tonight (Wednesday) at 7.30pm in the Main Hall.
There will also be a Kirk Session meeting on Wednesday at 7.30 pm in the Session Room.
"One kirk session voted to depart from the church's traditional view of marriage, and one kirk session was neither in favour or against.
Kirk session member John Paterson, who looks after the property, told the Advertiser: "We think it's people throwing stones in the graveyard beside the church.
In 1977, after 57 years as organist and choir director, she retired from that position and a year later was elected to the kirk session serving in that capacity until her retirement in October 2012.
The churches will now be looked after by an interim minister and interim kirk session until a new minister can be installed.
The note, for instance, to 'Hey a Rose Malindey' (Child 20 "The Cruel Mother') cites a kirk session minute of 1790: 'the inhabitants in Glenbuchat were excited by the discovery of an infant's body on a dunghill.
'Heritors' (landowners) had an equally deep-seated suspicion about how the Kirk Session would spend money--and the political clout to ensure their own vision of 'economy' prevailed--a situation not reached in England until 1834.
While Totten always gives the impression he would be as at home sitting in the Kirk Session as he has been in the dug out.
The Kirk Session of Langton and Polwarth Church has announced that Polwarth Church near Greenlaw, Berwickshire, which dates back to the mid 13th Century, has been acquired by local man Charles Letts.
Without the assistance of the magistrate, the kirk session could sentence sinners to the "jougs": iron neck collars that subjected the offender not simply to public imprisonment but physical abuse from passersby; to the branks, an iron mask that painfully depressed the tongue; to the ducking stool, which during the winter could entail considerable discomfort; to wrist manacles with which the sinner was chained to the churchyard wall; and to two weeks' imprisonment in the church steeple on bread and water.