kit fox

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kit fox

n.
A small fox (Vulpes macrotis) of western US and Mexican grasslands and deserts, having large ears and gray to buff or sometimes reddish fur with black at the tip of the tail.

[Probably from kit, in reference to its small size.]

kit fox

n
(Animals) another name for swift fox
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kit fox - small grey fox of southwestern United Stateskit fox - small grey fox of southwestern United States; may be a subspecies of Vulpes velox
fox - alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tail; most are predators that do not hunt in packs
2.kit fox - small grey fox of the plains of western North Americakit fox - small grey fox of the plains of western North America
fox - alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tail; most are predators that do not hunt in packs
References in periodicals archive ?
We used scats of two sympatric species, coyotes Canis latrans and kit foxes Vulpes macrotis, as model carnivores and investigated factors influencing scat removal in summer and winter.
Badgers, coyotes, kit foxes, owls, and rattlesnakes all eat kangaroo rats.
Here we report observations between San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and American badgers that provide further insight into the interactions between badgers and canids.
In more arid climes, the much smaller swift and kit foxes prevail, although red foxes are increasing their range and often kill swift and kit foxes should their paths ever cross.
Researchers in Utah are using them to study desert kit foxes, and Texas State University scientists have used drones to study invasive plant communities.
Kit Foxes in Oregon are listed under the Oregon Endangered Species Act as threatened, but little effort toward their study has occurred since listing.
Several fishers recently have been found dead and tested positive for rodenticides, as have federally endangered San Joaquin kit foxes.
The combo of granite, native plants, and wildlife--from kit foxes to jackrabbits--translates into primo hiking terrain.
2004) and a recent stable isotope analysis demonstrates that kit foxes inhabiting Bakersfield, CA have isotopic gradients that are similar to the human population from this city but distinct from rural kit foxes that rely on natural prey (Newsome et al.
The banker will permanently protect and manage this habitat for kit foxes.
However, the literature is sparse in documenting kit foxes and other arid-land fox species as prey items, either because it has not been a common research objective, or these interactions are infrequent, and when observed, are not being reported.