kithara


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kith·a·ra

 (kĭth′ər-ə)
n.
Variant of cithara.

kithara

(ˈkɪθərə)
n
(Instruments) a variant of cithara

kith•a•ra

(ˈkɪθ ər ə)

also cithara



n., pl. -ras.
a lyrelike musical instrument of ancient Greece having a wooden soundbox.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kithára lyre; compare guitar, zither]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kithara's collection for the show will revolve around the concepts of multi culturalism and surrealism.
(From left) Jam Raquion (Jam-packed), Carlyn Ocampo, Beverly Cumla, Elle Uy (Elle Uy Decor), (standing, from left) Joel Minas, Janine Tenoso, Dex Galsim (KITHARA), Alicia Litonjua (Lesha), Patrick San Juan (KITHARA), Stephen Flores (InReelLife), Poli Policarpio (KITHARA), Benedict Cua, Melissa Ricks, Amy Talaboc, Adrian Apollo Ortega (KITHARA) and Jun Tovera (KITHARA).
Six music artists composed of South Border, True Faith, Hale, Mark Carpio and Kithara, as well as DJ Matt Carbonell will perform in the Valentine party dubbed 'Heart Beats 2.0' on Feb.
kithara, calms the great wave of deep-roaring becoming" (cf.
(39) Laches expresses this by calling the real man musical--mousikos, not that the real man has a particularly good ear, or voice, or is a virtuoso on the kithara, but rather that he has an art of harmonizing speech and deed in one life so as to show himself as he really is.
(3.) Park Y, Moryama A, Kithara T, Yoshida Y, Urita T, Kato R.
blue pencil-marks made against the dance-loving Kithara and the footsteps of the Muses and the Nereids dancing on the shining sands.
A MEMORANDUM of Understanding (MoU) has been signed between the Government of Pakistan, Kuwait Petroleum Corporation and Kithara Pakistan for exploration of oil and gas in Baharpur block.
The Syracusan, responsible for the hired entertainment, brings to Callias's party a good piper ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), (26) a female dancer, and a good-looking young man who dances and plays the kithara: "The female piper played her aulos, the young man played his kithara, and everyone seemed to be quite entertained" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 2.1-2).
To the left, the National Museum's cue card explains, Apollo holds a cithera ("cithara" or "kithara") the lyre-like instrument frequently captured in Greco-Roman art.