knave


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Related to knave: Knave of Hearts

knave

 (nāv)
n.
1. An unprincipled, crafty fellow.
2.
a. A male servant.
b. A man of humble birth.
3. Games See jack.

[Middle English, from Old English cnafa, boy, male servant.]

knav′ish adj.
knav′ish·ly adv.
knav′ish·ness n.

knave

(neɪv)
n
1. archaic a dishonest man; rogue
2. (Card Games) another word for jack16
3. obsolete a male servant
[Old English cnafa; related to Old High German knabo boy]
ˈknavish adj
ˈknavishly adv
ˈknavishness n

knave

(neɪv)

n.
1. an unprincipled, untrustworthy, or dishonest person.
2. (in cards) the jack.
3. Archaic.
a. a male servant.
b. a man of humble position.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English cnafa, c. Old High German knabo boy; akin to Old English cnapa, Old High German knappo]
syn: knave, rascal, rogue, scoundrel are disparaging terms applied to persons considered base, dishonest, or unprincipled. knave, which formerly meant a male servant, in modern use emphasizes baseness of nature and intention: a swindling knave. rascal suggests a certain shrewdness and trickery: The rascal ran off with my money. rogue often refers to a worthless person who preys on the community: pictures of criminals in a rogues' gallery. scoundrel, a stronger term, suggests a base, immoral, even wicked person: Those scoundrels finally went to jail. rascal and rogue are often used affectionately or humorously to describe a mischievous person: I'll bet that rascal hid my slippers. The little rogues ate all the cookies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knave - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrelknave - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
scoundrel, villain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
2.knave - one of four face cards in a deck bearing a picture of a young princeknave - one of four face cards in a deck bearing a picture of a young prince
court card, face card, picture card - one of the twelve cards in a deck bearing a picture of a face

knave

noun (Archaic) rogue, cheat, villain, rascal, scoundrel, scally (Northwest English dialect), swindler, bounder (old-fashioned Brit. slang), rotter (slang, chiefly Brit.), reprobate, scallywag (informal), scumbag (slang), scamp, blackguard, cocksucker (taboo slang), scapegrace, rapscallion, varlet (archaic) It is difficult to believe that he is such a knave behind my back.
Translations
ماكِر، خَدّاع
knægt
gosi
kalps

knave

[neɪv] N (Hist) → bellaco m, bribón m (Cards) → valet m; (in Spanish pack) → sota f

knave

[ˈneɪv] nvalet m

knave

n
(old)Bube m (old), → Schurke m
(Brit Cards) → Bube m, → Unter m (old)

knave

[neɪv] n (old) → furfante m (Cards) → fante m

knave

(neiv) noun
a jack in a pack of playing-cards. the knave of diamonds.
References in classic literature ?
cried he, "whither hath that knave gone that was with me but now?
But as for this same knave Robin Hood, I go straightway to seek him, and if I do not score his knave's pate, cut my staff into fagots and call me woman.
The Emperor was surprised at this bold proposal, however it appeared the wisest to him; 'You are a knave he replied after a moment's consideration, however your advice is good, and displays prudence, as your offense shows adventurous courage.
And thinking to bring shame on Goldboru, and wed her with a kitchen knave, he sent for Havelok.
These clothes even that I wear are the cook's, and I am his knave.
She could not forget that she was a princess, and that she had been forced to wed a low-born kitchen knave.
You have uttered a reply, knave, which deserves the halter.
So this is as much as to say, perverse and thieving knave that you are, that you permit yourself to be lacking in respect towards the Auditor of the Châtelet, to the magistrate committed to the popular police of Paris, charged with searching out crimes, delinquencies, and evil conduct; with controlling all trades, and interdicting monopoly; with maintaining the pavements; with debarring the hucksters of chickens, poultry, and water-fowl; of superintending the measuring of fagots and other sorts of wood; of purging the city of mud, and the air of contagious maladies; in a word, with attending continually to public affairs, without wages or hope of salary
But it does not please me, thou knave,'' said Cedric, ``that I should be made to suppose otherwise for two hours, and sit here devising vengeance against my neighbours for wrongs they have not done me.
Go to, knave, go to thy place and thou, Gurth, get thee another dog, and should the keeper dare to touch it, I will mar his archery; the curse of a coward on my head, if I strike not off the forefinger of his right hand
Then followed the Knave of Hearts, carrying the King's crown on a crimson velvet cushion; and, last of all this grand procession, came THE KING AND QUEEN OF HEARTS.
She said it to the Knave of Hearts, who only bowed and smiled in reply.