knew


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knew

 (no͞o, nyo͞o)
v.
Past tense of know.

knew

(njuː)
vb
the past tense of know

know

(noʊ)

v. knew, known, know•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to perceive or understand as fact or truth; apprehend clearly and with certainty.
2. to have fixed in the mind or memory: to know a poem by heart.
3. to be cognizant of: I know it.
4. to be acquainted or familiar with (a thing, place, person, etc.): I know the mayor well.
5. to understand from experience or practice: to know how to make gingerbread.
6. to be able to distinguish, as one from another: to know right from wrong.
7. to recognize: I'd know her if I saw her again.
8. Archaic. to have sexual intercourse with.
v.i.
9. to have knowledge or clear and certain perception, as of fact or truth.
10. to be cognizant or aware, as of some circumstance or occurrence; have information.
n.
11. the fact or state of knowing; knowledge.
Idioms:
in the know, privy to information.
[before 900; Middle English knowen, knawen, Old English gecnāwan; c. Old High German -cnāhan, Old Norse knā to know how, be able to; akin to Latin(g)nōscere, Greek gignṓskein. See gnostic, can1]
know′a•ble, adj.
know′er, n.
Translations

know

(nəu) past tense knew (njuː) : past participle known verb
1. to be aware of or to have been informed about. He knows everything; I know he is at home because his car is in the drive; He knows all about it; I know of no reason why you cannot go.
2. to have learned and to remember. He knows a lot of poetry.
3. to be aware of the identity of; to be friendly with. I know Mrs Smith – she lives near me.
4. to (be able to) recognize or identify. You would hardly know her now – she has become very thin; He knows a good car when he sees one.
ˈknowing adjective
showing secret understanding. She gave him a knowing look.
ˈknowingly adverb
1. in a knowing manner. She smiled knowingly.
2. deliberately or on purpose. He would not knowingly insult her.
ˈknow-all noun
an unkind name for a person who thinks he knows everything.
ˈknow-how noun
the practical knowledge and skill to deal with something. She has acquired a lot of know-how about cars.
in the know
having information possessed only by a small group of people. People in the know tell me that she is the most likely person to get the job.
know backwards
to know extremely well or perfectly. He knows his history backwards.
know better
to be too wise or well-taught (to do something). She should know better at her age!; He should have known better than to trust them.
know how to
to have learned the way to. She already knew how to read when she went to school.
know the ropes
to understand the detail and procedure of a job etc.
References in classic literature ?
Her next question and your next answer informed me that this person was a friend of my sister's, who felt a strong interest in her, and who knew that you had just returned from a visit to Norah.
He knew too that the brains of many great men, whose thoughts he had read, had brooded over death and yet knew not a hundredth part of what his wife and Agafea Mihalovna knew about it.
Jerry knew this, as did his father and mother and brother, for they had smelled the unmistakable burnt-meat smell, and Terrence, in his rage of knowledge, had even attacked Mogom the house-boy, and been reprimanded and cuffed by Mister Haggin, who had not smelled and did not understand, and who had always to impress discipline on all creatures under his roof-tree.
He says he knows it was all his fault, though he is sure he did the best he knew, and he says if Beauty dies no one will ever speak to him again.
She put her hands to her dress, as if she hardly knew.
He knew her to be so, without looking at her, and said:
How, if I knew nothing at all of Meno, could I tell if he was fair, or the opposite of fair; rich and noble, or the reverse of rich and noble?
I knew him at once, because I happened to have watched him make his hundred at Lord's only the day before.
When Tantripp was brushing my hair the other day, she said that Sir James's man knew from Mrs.
I knew you'd be glad to have it--poor little lonesome thing
She always knew beforehand when she was going to blush, long before the blush came.
But after knowing you even for this short time, I knew you were quite the opposite of that, and I remembered that the first thing you had done on coming into the money had been to offer me half, so the information that you were the Lord Dawlish whom I had been hating did not affect me.