knickerbockers


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Knick·er·bock·er

 (nĭk′ər-bŏk′ər)
n.
1.
a. A descendant of the Dutch settlers of New York.
b. A native or inhabitant of New York.
2. knickerbockers Full breeches gathered and banded just below the knee; knickers.

[After Diedrich Knickerbocker, , fictitious author of History of New York by Washington Irving.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knickerbockers

(ˈnɪkəˌbɒkəz)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) baggy breeches fastened with a band at the knee or above the ankle. Also called (US): knickers
[C19: regarded as the traditional dress of the Dutch settlers in America; see Knickerbocker]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

knickerbockers

Full pants that are gathered at the knees. knife pleat A very narrow, often permanent, flat pleat in a garment, especially a skirt.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knickerbockers - trousers ending above the kneeknickerbockers - trousers ending above the knee  
britches - informal term for breeches
buckskins - breeches made of buckskin
codpiece - (15th-16th century) a flap for the crotch of men's tight-fitting breeches
plus fours - men's baggy knickers hanging below the knees; formerly worn for sports (especially golf)
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
trunk hose - puffed breeches of the 16th and 17th centuries usually worn over hose
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بَنْطَلون قَصير
knæbukser
bikses
golfky
golf pantolonu

knickerbockers

[ˈnɪkəbɒkəz] NPLpantalones mpl cortos (US) → pantalones mpl de golf, pantalones mpl holgados
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

knickerbockers

plKnickerbocker pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

knickerbockers

[ˈnɪkəˌbɒkəz] nknickerbockers mpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

knickerbockers

(ˈnikəˌbokəz) noun
(American knickers) short trousers that fit tightly just below the knees, used together with knee socks for skiing and hiking.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He had such a cheery way of whistling, she had told me, it had always brightened her at her work to hear him whistling, and when he whistled he stood with his legs apart, and his hands in the pockets of his knickerbockers. I decided to trust to this, so one day after I had learned his whistle (every boy of enterprise invents a whistle of his own) from boys who had been his comrades, I secretly put on a suit of his clothes, dark grey they were, with little spots, and they fitted me many years afterwards, and thus disguised I slipped, unknown to the others, into my mother's room.
On Tuesday he climbed the stone stair of the Gold King, looking over his shoulder gloriously at each step, and on Wednesday he struck three and went into knickerbockers. For the Kensington Gardens, you must know, are full of short cuts, familiar to all who play there; and the shortest leads from the baby in long clothes to the little boy of three riding on the fence.
There is a type of such institutions in the suburbs; the youths go about in knickerbockers, smoking pipes, except on Saturday nights, when they lead each other home from the last train.
"Ah, how this brings it all back to me--I see everybody here in knickerbockers and pantalettes," she said, with her trailing slightly foreign accent, her eyes returning to his face.
For dress the insect wore a dark-blue swallowtail coat with a yellow silk lining and a flower in the button-hole; a vest of white duck that stretched tightly across the wide body; knickerbockers of fawn-colored plush, fastened at the knees with gilt buckles; and, perched upon its small head, was jauntily set a tall silk hat.
It is true that for a few years after leaving the cradle he had exhibited a certain immatureness, but as soon as he put on knickerbockers and began to go about a little he outgrew all that.
Here and there a well-known actor passed, elaborately unconscious of the attention he excited: sometimes he wore patent leather boots, a coat with an astrakhan collar, and carried a silver-knobbed stick; and sometimes, looking as though he had come from a day's shooting, he strolled in knickerbockers, and ulster of Harris tweed, and a tweed hat on the back of his head.
She had a great bundle of red papers under her arm, while Charles, who sat behind her clad in Norfolk jacket and knickerbockers, bore a similar roll protruding from either pocket.
He was dressed in a cherry-coloured blazer, knickerbockers, red stockings, and bicycle shoes, with a red flannel cap at the back of the head.
He was dressed in knickerbockers, with red stockings, which displayed his poor little spindle-shanks; he also wore a brilliant red cravat.
With a pendulum-like swoop through the crowd, that sent people flying right and left the grapnel came to earth again, tried for and missed a stout gentleman in a blue suit and a straw hat, smacked away a trestle from under a stall of haberdashery, made a cyclist soldier in knickerbockers leap like a chamois, and secured itself uncertainly among the hind-legs of a sheep--which made convulsive, ungenerous efforts to free itself, and was dragged into a position of rest against a stone cross in the middle of the place.
Only a specimen of early tourist in knickerbockers, conspicuous by a brand-new yellow leather glass-case, hung about for a moment, scenting something unusual about these four people within the rusty iron gates of what looked the grounds run wild of an unoccupied private house.