knish


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knish

 (kə-nĭsh′)
n.
A piece of dough stuffed with potato, meat, or cheese and baked or fried.

[Yiddish, from Ukrainian knysh and Polish, knysz (Ukranian, from Polish) : dialectal Polish kien, kn-, trunk, stump, bole (akin to Lithuanian kunas, body) + Polish -ysz, n. suff.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knish

(knɪʃ)
n
(Cookery) a piece of dough stuffed with potato, meat, or some other filling and baked or fried
[Yiddish, from Russian knysh cake; compare Polish knysz]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

knish

(knɪʃ)

n.
a baked turnover filled usu. with potatoes, kasha, or meat.
[1925–30; < Yiddish < Polish knysz]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knish - (Yiddish) a baked or fried turnover filled with potato or meat or cheese; often eaten as a snack
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
turnover - a dish made by folding a piece of pastry over a filling
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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Having grown up around engines, Emily Knish tends to the hobby in both a hands-on way and with an eye to the future, telling her friends about old engines and encouraging them to attend shows.
They exist in almost every culinary culture around the world, generally in very much the same format, from the empanadas of South America to the knish of Israel, from Turkey's spicy borek to the curried goat patties of Jamaica.
Its authors, Emanuel Morgan and Anne Knish, were really Witter Bynner and Arthur Davison Ficke respectively, and they kept up their facade for nearly two years, producing unexpectedly striking poetry in the process, including some of the most resonant responses to World War I.
Other area finishers: Knish (Wheeling) 22-02.75; Sheasby (Buffalo Grove) 21-01.25; Olaitan (Schaumburg) 20-11.75; Chindblom (Fremd) 20-10.75.
Quoting Michael Wex's definition as to the derivation of schmuck is way off base ("When a Knish Is More Than a Knish," January/February 2018).
When Liz Mennen, a Manhattan transplant, arrived in Atlanta at age 22, she searched everywhere for a staple of her youth: the knish. But the dough-encrusted, potato-filled Jewish pastry was nowhere to be found, except in the frozen-food aisle of Kroger supermarkets.
Hasia Diner's seminal Hungering for America (2008) spawned a spate of academic books on the history of particular Jewish foods, including Maria Balinska's The Bagel (2009), Laura Silver's Knish (2014), and my own Pastrami on Rye (2015).
It has also been found that counselor-perceptions of forming a meaningful connection with their clients are important (Kadambi, Audet & Knish, 2010).
charity place2be."STRESS have thoughts "How mental health "As coping do this "strategies, for on your with all around about finding the when KNish DO THINGS YOU ENJOY "EXERCISE shouldn't be a torture, and if it is, you're doing the wrong one!
An elderly Jewish gentleman almost wept over the knish (potato dumplings) from the Yona Schimmel Knishery on the Lower East Side, where we started our tour.
The children's plate includes a hot dog, potato knish, pickle, and a cookie.