knish

(redirected from knishes)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

knish

 (kə-nĭsh′)
n.
A piece of dough stuffed with potato, meat, or cheese and baked or fried.

[Yiddish, from Ukrainian knysh and Polish, knysz (Ukranian, from Polish) : dialectal Polish kien, kn-, trunk, stump, bole (akin to Lithuanian kunas, body) + Polish -ysz, n. suff.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knish

(knɪʃ)
n
(Cookery) a piece of dough stuffed with potato, meat, or some other filling and baked or fried
[Yiddish, from Russian knysh cake; compare Polish knysz]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

knish

(knɪʃ)

n.
a baked turnover filled usu. with potatoes, kasha, or meat.
[1925–30; < Yiddish < Polish knysz]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knish - (Yiddish) a baked or fried turnover filled with potato or meat or cheese; often eaten as a snack
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
turnover - a dish made by folding a piece of pastry over a filling
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Over 150 lowfat international vegan recipes with nutritional breakdowns, including Romanian Apricot Dumplings, Pumpernickel Bread, Polish Stuffed Cabbage, Potato Knishes, North African Barley Pudding, and much more.
Mennen's knishes epitomize the Jewish-food scene in Atlantasteeped in tradition but constantly innovating.
The restaurant has been shipping its products -- not the whole menu, but latkes, pastrami, corned beef, knishes, babka, pickles and more -- domestically since the 1990s.
NYC Vegan: Iconic Recipes for a Taste of the Big Apple provides a fine celebration of old and modern New York tastes with a vegan twist, including ethnic, neighborhood, and regional specialties that range from soft pretzels and knishes to pot pies, Italian lasagna, and falafel.
Jewish delis actually arose from the numerous New York kosher butcher shops, which began selling prepared foods, cooked meats, and quick snacks like knishes. But Merwin argues that the first generation of Eastern European immigrants bought little ready-to-eat deli food since it was quite expensive, especially the meats, and immigrant women resisted take-out food as a dereliction of their home cooking duties.
WHAT: Enjoy cheese blintzes, sandwiches filled with superior meats from Evan's Deli, potato knishes, latkes and more!
And readers may be starded by his extensive discussion of the resemblance of triangular hamantaschen, knishes and pierogi to a specific feature of the female anatomy.
NY Bagel Cafe isn't just great bagels either, NY Bagel also offers wraps, panini sandwiches, Knishes and Hot Pastrami sandwiches, along with a full deli.
The Joy of Ballpark Food from Hot Dogs to Haute Cuisine traces the history and evolution of ballpark food, from how the hot dog came to America and came to be associated with baseball to other foods associated with ballpark events, from Cracker Jack to the later appearance of nachos and knishes.
Some menu items are the same as what you get in the store: your chopped liver, your knishes, your pickles and pickled herring.
I like latkes, knishes, and even gefilte fish--which makes me a gastronomic Jew.