knockabout


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knock·a·bout

 (nŏk′ə-bout′)
adj.
1. Boisterous; rowdy.
2. Appropriate for rough wear or use: a knockabout overcoat.
n.
A small sloop with a mainsail, jib, and keel but no bowsprit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knock•a•bout

(ˈnɒk əˌbaʊt)

n.
1. a small fore-and-aft–rigged sailboat with a mainsail and a jib but no bowsprit.
2. something designed or suitable for rough or casual use, as a sturdy jacket or old car.
adj.
3. suitable for rough use, as a garment.
4. rough; boisterous.
5. slapstick: knockabout comedy.
6. shiftless; aimless.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knockabout - a sloop with a simplified rig and no bowspritknockabout - a sloop with a simplified rig and no bowsprit
sloop - a sailing vessel with a single mast set about one third of the boat's length aft of the bow
Adj.1.knockabout - full of rough and exuberant animal spirits; "boisterous practical jokes"; "knockabout comedy"
spirited - displaying animation, vigor, or liveliness
2.knockabout - suitable for rough use; "a knockabout overcoat"; "a knockabout old car"
rugged - sturdy and strong in constitution or construction; enduring; "with a house full of boys you have to have rugged furniture"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

knockabout

adjective boisterous, riotous, rollicking, rough-and-tumble, rumbustious, rambunctious (informal), harum-scarum, farcical, slapstick It is all good knockabout fun.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

knockabout

adjective
Marked by vigorous physical exertion:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

knockabout

[ˈnɒkəbaʊt]
A. ADJ (esp Brit) → bullicioso, tumultuoso
knockabout comedyfarsa f bulliciosa
B. N (Sport) to have a knockaboutpelotear
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
His life was a tragedy written in the terms of knockabout farce.
The main ring will be packed with entertainment from 2pm until 5pm, with the highlights being Dangerous Steve, with his knockabout crazy balancing and a thrilling fire and chainsaw juggling finale, Adrenaline Tour quad bike stunts and the Falconry School with Ben Long.
The tone veers wildly throughout the film, one minute a buddy cop picture, then it's a gritty drama about the Klan, next it's a knockabout comedy.
? IT is something that may happen in the playground when young children are having a knockabout game of cricket.
Logic and consistency are beside the point in this knockabout mash-up of gleeful violence, dual roles, multiple personalities and multiverse dimensions, which results in undemanding fun.
There's also a robust physical comedy that lends a strangely knockabout air.
Mick His Knockabout Queen won't be making the long journey from Berkshire for the good of her health and is a strong fancy in Get So Much More With Racing UK Selling Stakes, having won in that grade last time at Windsor despite being slowly into her stride.
It included an easy knockabout with some infants who were "very excited to meet a princess", according to British number one Johanna Konta who attended as an ambassador for the tennis for the programme.
"The public are very disillusioned with knockabout party politics after low-level debates in the referendum and the General Election" Veteran Tory MP Kenneth Clarke.
The consequences of the focus on my faith is that I have found myself torn between living as a faithful Christian and serving as a political leader" Tim Farron, who is stepping down as Liberal Democrat leader "We are a Government in waiting" Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn "The public are very disillusioned with knockabout party politics after low-level debates in the referendum and the General Election" Veteran Tory MP Kenneth Clarke
Blood Ties Thursday 9pm Film4 Despite the Starsky & Hutch stylings, this is no knockabout crime caper.
In the 14th century, English adopted farce from French, retaining its original meaning of "stuffing of forcemeat." The comedic sense of farce in English dates back to the 16th century, when England imported a kind of knockabout comedy that was already well-established in France and Italy.