knotgrass


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

knot·grass

 (nŏt′grăs′)
n.
1. A low-growing, weedy grass (Paspalum distichum) with spikelets arranged in two rows along the rachis.
2. Any of several weedy plants of the genus Polygonum having stems with nodes.

knotgrass

(ˈnɒtˌɡrɑːs)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: allseed a polygonaceous weedy plant, Polygonum aviculare, whose small green flowers produce numerous seeds
2. (Plants) any of several related plants

knot•grass

(ˈnɒtˌgræs, -ˌgrɑs)
n.
1. a common knotweed, Polygonum aviculare, with small leaves and dry fruit that are eaten by birds.
2. a widespread creeping grass, Paspalum distichum, that forms large mats in shallow waters and ditches.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knotgrass - low-growing weedy grass with spikelets along the leaf stems
grass - narrow-leaved green herbage: grown as lawns; used as pasture for grazing animals; cut and dried as hay
genus Paspalum - a genus of perennial grasses of warm regions
Translations

knotgrass

n (Bot) → Knöterich m

knotgrass

[ˈnɒtˌgrɑːs] ncentinodia
References in periodicals archive ?
Biodegradation and adsorption were probably the processes that most contributed to the efficiencies greater than 99% in the first analysis time (24 h) for constructed wetlands planted with tifton 85 grass, knotgrass, mint and without vegetation.
Remains of wild taxa, such as pale persicaria (Persicaria lapathifolia), knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare), wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum), bladder campion (Silene vulgaris), and corn spurrey (Spergula arvensis) were the most common weeds in the latrine samples and presumably stem from the surrounding disturbed habitats at the sea fortress.
common knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare), red clover (Trifolium pratense), veronica (Veronica persica), annual bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.
knotweed, knotgrass Rumex conglomeratus Murray * clustered dock Rumex crispus L.
The company developed and tested a patented skin care line using some of the most advanced skin care technologies in the world, including the exclusive RxGen Stem CellTechnology, Biomimetic Peptides, and a unique Knotgrass extract, as well as time-tested skin care ingredients like vitamins B5, C, and E, hyaluronic Acid and Green tea Extract.
One of Digital Domain's main tasks on "Maleficent" was a creating a trio of tiny CG pixies - Flittle, Knotgrass and Thistletwit - based on three real actresses who also appear in their life-sized form in several sequences.
WHILE Angelina Jolie starred as Maleficent, the film, about to be released on DVD, was stolen by the three pixies - Knotgrass, Flittle and Thistlewit.
King Stefan entrusts the babe to bickering fairies Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton), Flittle (Lesley Manville) and Thistletwit (Juno Temple), who raise Aurora in a secluded woodland cottage.
The spin-off names them Thistletwit, Flittle and Knotgrass.
She swears revenge and curses his baby daughter, Princess Aurora - whose bickering babysitters include fairies Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton), Flittle (Lesley Manville) and Thistletwit Juno Temple) - to prick her finger on a spinning wheel aged 16 and fall into eternal She swears revenge and curses his baby daughter, Princess Aurora - whose bickering babysitters include fairies Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton), Flittle (Lesley Manville) and Thistletwit Juno Temple) - to prick her finger on a spinning wheel aged 16 and fall into eternal slumber with only true love's kiss able to break the enchantment.
She swears revenge and curses his baby daughter, Princess Aurora - whose bickering babysitters include fairies Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton), Flittle (Lesley Manville) and Thistletwit (Juno Temple) - to prick her finger on a spinning wheel aged 16 and fall into eternal slumber with only true love's kiss able to break the enchantment.
For about 20 minutes after that, Maleficent is mean, | Angelina as Meleficent | Princess Aurora (played by Elle Fanning) | Fairies Knotgrass Imelda Staunton), Flittle Lesley Manville) and Thistlewit Juno moody and magnificent, and so potentially dark and dangerous that it could terrify some children under seven.