knothole

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knot·hole

 (nŏt′hōl′)
n.
A hole in a piece of lumber where a knot has dropped out or been removed.

knothole

(ˈnɒtˌhəʊl)
n
a hole in a piece of wood where a knot has been

knot•hole

(ˈnɒtˌhoʊl)

n.
a hole in a board or plank formed by the falling out of a knot or a portion of a knot.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knothole - a hole in a board where a knot came out
hole - an opening into or through something
plank, board - a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes
Translations

knothole

[ˈnɒthəʊl] Nagujero m (que deja un nudo en la madera)

knothole

n (in timber) → Astloch nt
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It was all the fault of the knothole," protested Phil.
It was a good thing the knothole was there," said Aunt Jamesina rather severely.
At these words the Cobbler's eyes opened big and wide, and his mouth grew round with wonder, like a knothole in a board fence.
44s I had the Hornady XTPs chewing little knotholes, with just a few leakers boosting group sizes.
cover cover knotholes or other minor voids in substrate with sheet metal flashing secured with roofingnails.
Paint the substrate black so it doesn't show through knotholes and other flaws.
He charged by the board foot, and I knew he was doing me a favor, but I was also after the odd shapes, knotholes, bark, and stains.
But the sinuous grain and knotholes, the factory stampings, and the marks of use, even the partially removed stickers, are all paint.
Two young boys--one white, the other African American--stand side by side outside the ballpark peering at the game through knotholes in the outfield fence.
It's getting to the point where the only reason to walk down the high street is to count the knotholes in the wood covering the windows.
In semi-darkness: light falls through the cracks and knotholes.
I missed the Rat Canyon Range; the dancing dust devils tearing away targets and flingin' 'em like a hurricane hitting a loaded clothesline; the gaping knotholes knocked out of the warped gray planks of the firing line, perfect for stickin' revolver barrels in to safely park your Roscoe; the overhead so shot fulla holes that when it rained and you were under it, it was raining there too, the only difference being that drizzle was filthy, fulla grit and desiccated bug corpses, so you stood out in the clean rain until the shower passed.