knout

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knout

 (nout)
n.
A leather scourge used for flogging.
tr.v. knout·ed, knout·ing, knouts
To flog with a knout.

[French, from Russian knut, from Old Russian knutŭ, from Old Norse knūtr, knot in cord.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knout

(naʊt)
n
a stout whip used formerly in Russia as an instrument of punishment
[C17: from Russian knut, of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse knūtr knot]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

knout

(naʊt)
n.
1. a whip with a lash of leather thongs, formerly used in Russia for flogging criminals.
v.t.
2. to flog with the knout.
[1710–20; < French < Russian knut, Old Russian]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knout - a whip with a lash of leather thongs twisted with wire; used for flogging prisoners
whip - an instrument with a handle and a flexible lash that is used for whipping
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

knout

[naʊt] Nknut m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

knout

nKnute f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in classic literature ?
We all profess the Christian law of forgiveness of injuries and love of our neighbors, the law in honor of which we have built in Moscow forty times forty churches- but yesterday a deserter was knouted to death and a minister of that same law of love and forgiveness, a priest, gave the soldier a cross to kiss before his execution." So thought Pierre, and the whole of this general deception which everyone accepts, accustomed as he was to it, astonished him each time as if it were something new.
I believe that he keeps a little private knout at home for his wife and children.
Pott's door, which door itself opened, and displayed the great Pott accoutred as a Russian officer of justice, with a tremendous knout in his hand--tastefully typical of the stern and mighty power of the Eatanswill GAZETTE, and the fearful lashings it bestowed on public offenders.
Torture in a public school is as much licensed as the knout in Russia.
'These young fellows nowadays want someone standing over them with a knout all the time.
The drivers disputed as to whose troyka should go ahead, and the youngest, seating himself sideways with a dashing air, swung his long knout and shouted to the horses.