kojiki


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Related to kojiki: Nihon Shoki

kojiki

Means “records of ancient matters.” It is one of the sacred Shinto scriptures.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Sumo was first mentioned in one of the holy books of Shinto, called the Kojiki or Records of Ancient Matters (AD712).
720), of the version of history in the Kojiki [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (712), and of passages from other contemporary writings, such as the fudoki [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (provincial records) and Kaifuso [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], to demonstrate that these texts portray disparate imperial imaginaries collected around the figure of the imperial sovereign Tenchi and the line of rulers descended from him.
According to Kojiki (712 AD, the oldest Japanese record), upset by the behavior of her younger brother Susano-wo, Amaterasu hid in a cave, and only an elaborate ritual, which included divination, the creation and use of special ritual objects, as well as the ecstatic performance of a shamanistic dance by another goddess, Ame-no-Uzume, could make her come out and save the world from eternal darkness.
This vision that can be found in the oldest book in Japan titled Kojiki compiled a little earlier than the abovementioned Nihon Shoki, has nothing nationalistic; it has nothing to do with politics.
Strecher discerns influences from east and west, including the narrative of Orpheus and Eurydice and the Kojiki creation myth of Japan.
This volume surveys major writers and works in Japanese literature from the 712 CE publication of The Kojiki to contemporary authors.
During the imperial rule of the 700s, the Kojiki, which was "the Japanese version of the biblical Genesis," was written.
Japanese mythology recorded in the oldest book of Japan titled Kojiki, Records of Ancient Matters (1) compiled in 712 AD indicates that Life and Death eternally coexist, facing each other.
The first descriptions of onsen appear in ancient Japanese history books such as the Kojiki and Nihonshoki.
Moreover, if we were to functionally distribute the two main religious currents, Shintoism, with all its animist religious manifestations, would be associated with the "forces of life and of fecundity," while Buddhism would be connected to "the world beyond and of death." (55) The oldest sacred text belonging to the Shintoist faith, Kojiki, was written in 721, and it was a compilation in three volumes of Japan's "ancient deeds," with the aim of presenting the genealogy of the gods, from the ones who had created the archipelago to the forefathers of the imperial house in Yamato, presided over by the sun goddess Amaterasu O-mikami ("the Great deity that lights up the sky").