kokako


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kokako

(ˈkəʊˌkɑːkəʊ)
n, pl -kos
(Animals) a dark grey long-tailed wattled crow of New Zealand, Callaeas cinerea
[Māori]
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pirongia Te Aroaro o Kahu Restoration Society - Re-establishing Kokako on Mt Pirongia ($40,000)
An internally-circulated list included the kokako, karearea (New Zealand falcon) and mohua (yellowhead) among others.
Successful recovery of North Island kokako (Callas cinerea wilsoni) populations, by adaptive management.
Catherine Mair, a haiku poet herself as well as the former editor of Kokako (then winterSPIN), headed the project, hoping to clean up the area around the Uretara Stream, which remains an important historical connection between settlers and the outside world.
Successful recovery of North Island kokako Callaeascinerea wilsoni populations, by adaptive management.
They enjoy beer brewed by the Tui Brewery purchased using notes and coins depicting various native species such as Kotuku (Great Egret), Kiwi, Silver Fern, Hoiho (Yellow-eyed Penguin), Whio (Blue Duck), Karearea (New Zealand Falcon), Kokako (Blue wattled crow), and Mohua (Yellowhead).
The takahe, kakapo, mohua and kokako are birds from which country?
There are many similar stories of island refugia becoming almost the sole home for particular fauna: black robin on Chatham Islands; North Island saddleback on Hen Islands; stitchbird and kokako birds on Little Barrier Island; kakapo birds on Codfish Island; giant weta insects on Poor Knights Islands; tuatara lizards on Stephens Island; and little spotted kiwibirds on Kapiti Island.
Systematic affinities of two enigmatic New Zealand passerines of high conservation priority, the hihi or stitchbird Notiomystis cincta and the kokako Callaeas cinerea.
150,000 for a three-year research and management project to help protect an endangered bird - the kokako.
The science is clear that the only way birds like kiwi, kokako, kea and kaka will survive is to effectively control pests like stoats, rats and possums that have decimated their populations.