kokiri


Also found in: Wikipedia.

kokiri

(ˈkɒkiːriː)
n, pl kokiri
1. (Animals) a rough-skinned New Zealand triggerfish, Parika scaber, known also as leatherjacket. See leatherjacket2
2. (Education) a Māori self-help group providing training and support in the community
[Māori]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
FUNDING CUTS, loss of contracts and changes to funding models have had a major impact on renegotiating NZNO's multi-employer collective agreement (MECA) covering Maori and iwi providers, Te Rau Kokiri (TRK).
Most of the between-group variation described by Te Puni Kokiri (2000) and others may, indeed, reside there.
In 2010, under the Te Rau Kokiri campaign (see p35), then Associate Health Minister Tariana Turia was presented with a whiri, a woven symbol of the campaign.
Victoria Owen analyses the policy implications of Te Puni Kokiri's report on Maori participation in programmes and services directed at youth offending.
NZNO IS still trying to reach a date for mediation with the 12 Maori and iwi health providers covered by their multi-employer collective agreement (MECA), Te Rau Kokiri.
Some gaps are widening and other gaps, not represented in statistical analysis, are inadequately considered in officialdom (Te Puni Kokiri 1999, James Henare Maori Research Centre (JHMRC) 2000).
The manager of Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae in Mangere, Valerie Teraitua, is the Maori public health champion.
The notion of Maori ownership and control over the capacity-building process was also stressed in promotional material published by Te Puni Kokiri. In it, Minister of Maori Affairs Parekura Horomia (cited in Te Puni Kokiri 2000a:1) described capacity building "as Maori development by themselves for themselves" and noted that such "bottom-up" development would allow Maori to come up with their own flexible and innovative solutions, without government telling people how they should "solve their problems" (Horomia 2000:1).