kosher-style


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ko′sher-style`



adj.
featuring traditional Jewish dishes but not adhering to the dietary laws: a kosher-style restaurant.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
After explaining why he never wore a yarmulke in public life, and discussing the challenges of keeping kosher while traveling the world (short version: a lot of vegetarian, "kosher-style" eating) he confirmed (at 36:18 in the podcast) that he did vote for Hillary Clintonbut dropped the bombshell (at 39:30) that if he had to choose in 2020 between Trump and Elizabeth Warren, he is not certain would he would do, for it would be "a tough call." Bernie Sanders would be "an easier call," because he is at least "the genuine article."
And while it serves all the Ashkenazi classics -- from pastrami to latkes, blintzes, matza ball soup and chopped liver -- it is neither kosher nor kosher-style.
"We are pleased and delighted to join with Brent Joseph, of the Hene family, and King David Dogs in a partnership that will enable us to offer the Signature King David all-beef, kosher-style, gourmet hot dogs - made with the highest quality and cooked perfectly in convenience stores and travel plazas across the country," said Allan Zukerman, chairman, CZ Growth Strategies.
Although the Orthodox population isn't as large as in cities like New York or Los Angeles, four neighborhoods have eruvs (an enclosure that allows residents to carry objects on Shabbat), and there are a number of kosher restaurants and kosher-style delis, as well as several day schools.
Kosher-style delis are largely establishments of the past.
Following a historical overview, they treat kashrut (Jewish dietary laws), major foods, daily and holiday/special occasion kosher and kosher-style menus, their health aspects, and cultural fusion (e.g., kosher sushi).
Fenway already sells Hebrew National kosher dogs, but those are "kosher-style" and aren't prepared, packaged, shipped and cooked under supervision of a rabbi or kosher-certification agency.
While a brisk tourist trade has led to the packaging of the Holocaust--complete with kosher-style restaurants, souvenir yellow stars, and "Schindler's List" tours of Treblinka and Auschwitz--a surge in the popularity of Klezmer music among gentile Poles has created what one interviewee calls "virtual Jewish reality"--Jewish culture without Jews.
It's right next to the Bezalel gift shop, which sells Judaica items, and the Garden of Eden restaurant--where guests can choose kosher-style items ranging from potato latkes ($1.50) to red beet borscht and vegetable knishes ($2.50 each).
The following is a sample of her humor; comparing Seattle (obviously a fake city) with a "real" city like New York, the author notes that in fake cities, "everyone has the recipe for New York hot dogs, kosher-style ...
No expression is more emblematic of the balancing act between Jewish tradition and American assimilation than "kosher-style." Though mutable, kosher-style typically denotes "a certain type of cooking or preparation that's reminiscent of Eastern European Jewish dishes but made without kosher ingredients" or the kosher supervision process, says Hasia Diner, professor of American Jewish history at New York University.