koumiss


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kou·miss

 (ko͞o-mĭs′, ko͞o′mĭs)
n.
Variant of kumiss.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.koumiss - an alcoholic beverage made from fermented mare's milk; made originally by nomads of central Asia
alcohol, alcoholic beverage, alcoholic drink, inebriant, intoxicant - a liquor or brew containing alcohol as the active agent; "alcohol (or drink) ruined him"
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the study, items to watch include sparkling milk, plus koumiss, a dairy beverage carbonated with yeast added prior to fermentation and currently popular in the Middle East.
Among the traditionally fermented milk products in Kenya is Mursik, a product with characteristics similar to those of yogurt, Leben (Tunisia), dahi (Arabia), kefir and koumiss of Central Asia [3].
This species was previously found to be the principal alcoholic fermentation microorganism of traditional koumiss [31].
Hao et al., "Characterization of an anti-Listeria bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus plantarum LB-B1 isolated from koumiss, a traditionally fermented dairy product from China," Food Control, vol.
In "Afteur Pasteur," the collective Slavs and Tatars hailed the microbes as "original Other or foreigner." The exhibition's centerpiece was a fully operational street-vendor machine serving ayran, a yogurt-like dairy drink of Mongolian and Turkish origin that, like kefir and koumiss, is making inroads into Western markets as a health food.
Yan, "Characterisation of Lactobacillus fermentum SM-7 isolated from koumiss, a potential probiotic bacterium with cholesterol-lowering effects," Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol.
The purpose of this study was the selection of new strains of lactic acid bacteria and yeast separated from local koumiss for the improvement of koumiss ferment and its impact on quality of koumiss.
The book's final essay on the Mongol era is Luo Feng's "Liquor Still and Milk-Wine Distilling Technology in the Mongol-Yuan Period." The author considers a Yuan-era bronze still from Inner Mongolia (and an analogous bronze still found in Hebei) to investigate the technical aspects of the instrument and its likely use for the production of koumiss; drawings and diagrams illustrate the author's points.
Sacred milks and cultured dairy products such as kefir, koumiss, liben and dahi, were often used therapeutically before the existence of microorganisms was recognized.