krimmer

krim·mer

 (krĭm′ər)
n.
Gray, curly fur made from the pelts of lambs of the Crimean region.

[German, from Krim, Crimea.]

krimmer

(ˈkrɪmə) or

crimmer

n
(Textiles) a tightly curled light grey fur obtained from the skins of lambs from the Crimean region
[C20: from German, from Krim Crimea]

krim•mer

or crim•mer

(ˈkrɪm ər)

n.
a lambskin from Crimea, dressed as a fur, with wool in loose, soft curls, usu. whitish or pale gray.
[1825–35; < German, =Krim Crimea + -er -er1]
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References in periodicals archive ?
NSW Fire Brigade Superintendent Ian Krimmer observed: The school was connected by a series of corridors with the wind just driving the fire through (SMH, 2005).
Krimmer, "Scaphotrapezio-trapezoid arthrodesis (triscaphe arthrodesis)," Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, Plastische Chirurgie, vol.
unaccounted for," Ian Krimmer, spokesman for the New South Wales Fire
NSW Fire and Rescue Superintendent Ian Krimmer told AFP 80 firefighters spent several hours battling the blaze before it was put out.
Ian Krimmer of the NSW Fire and Rescue assured that fire fighters to contain the gas explosion with the help of gas company workers.
Fast, 1910), 136, 144, 166, 167; Fast was a member of the Krimmer Mennonite Brethren and in 1915 the first editor of what would become its newspaper, Der Wahrheitsfreund.
Brian Oliver, PhD, a pharmacologist at the University of Sydney, and lead researcher David Krimmer, a PhD candidate there, used lung tissue from donors with and without COPD to see how the tissue would react when exposed to cigarette smoke.
We have demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by fibroblasts following stimulation with cigarette smoke extract is functionally different than non-exposed ECM, and that the cigarette smoke itself may prime the airways in such a way to create an environment whereby airway remodelling is encouraged," wrote lead researcher David Krimmer of the University of Sydney in Australia.
Even so, Krimmer describes the experience as "painfully humbling" for Juliane (Company 184).
Susanne Kord and Elisabeth Krimmer, who call themselves "recovering Hollywood addicts", have plunged into the pool of films from the 1990s and the first decade of this century to uncover the secrets of the modern representation of women on screen.
Either Krimmer is wrong, or else Richter has attempted the impossible.