kudzu


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kud·zu

 (ko͝od′zo͞o, kŭd′-)
n.
An East Asian vine (Pueraria lobata) in the pea family, having compound leaves and clusters of reddish-purple flowers. It is grown for fodder, forage, and root starch, and is a widespread weed in the southeast United States.

[Japanese kuzu.]

kudzu

(ˈkʊdzuː)
n
(Plants) a hairy leguminous climbing plant, Pueraria thunbergiana, of China and Japan, with trifoliate leaves and purple fragrant flowers
[from Japanese kuzu]

kud•zu

(ˈkʊd zu)
n., pl. -zus.
a fast-growing vine, Pueraria lobata, of the legume family, planted esp. for fodder and to retain soil.
[1890–95; < Japanese kuzu]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kudzu - fast-growing vine from eastern Asia having tuberous starchy roots and hairy trifoliate leaves and racemes of purple flowers followed by long hairy pods containing many seedskudzu - fast-growing vine from eastern Asia having tuberous starchy roots and hairy trifoliate leaves and racemes of purple flowers followed by long hairy pods containing many seeds; grown for fodder and forage and root starch; widespread in the southern United States
genus Pueraria, Pueraria - genus of woody Asiatic vines: kudzu
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
References in periodicals archive ?
The conduction of this study adopted a completely randomized design (CRD) with the following factorial arrangement: 3 tropical forage legumes (stylosanthes campo grande (80% Stylosanthes capitata + 20% Stylosanthes macrocephala), tropical kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb.
The leguminous crops calopo and tropical kudzu were planted one month after the banana crop and distributed in the interrows, in seven rows spaced by 0.
Kudzu was introduced with good intentions into the southeastern United States in the late 1800s.
Department of Agriculture (USDA), which paid farmers for planting kudzu tubers.
Kudzu was brought to the United States in 1876, at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia as part of a beautiful Japanese garden exhibit.
Without any natural predators, and with the warm moist climate conditions in the Southeast, kudzu appears to have gone wild over the countryside, engulfing thousands of acres of trees, shrubs, buildings or just about anything in its path.
The Kudzu Cookbook: Cooking Up a Storm with That Wild & Crazy Vine That Grows in Miles-per-Hour
Kudzu as local biomass is an example of lignocellulosic material that has been used in this study.
com)-- Home Energy Solutions was named a Best of 2014 winner for Insulation and Energy in Georgia on Kudzu.
To determine the antioxidant content, kudzu leaves were collected from naturally growing vine around Jacksonville, Alabama (USA) whereas fresh spinach, packaged nori seaweed, and fresh shiitake mushrooms were purchased locally from the grocery store.
KUDZU CONTRACTOR RATINGS: Kudzu is a referral service that features local business information and consumer reviews.