kurdaitcha


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kurdaitcha

(kəˈdaɪtʃə)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) (in certain Central Australian Aboriginal tribes) the man with the mission of avenging the death of a tribesman. Also: kadaitcha
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-ceremonial objects on display included headbands made from human hair and ochre, armbands, beads, shields, Kurdaitcha shoes, (11) stone knives and axes, various weapons (such as boomerangs of many types), hunting and fighting spears and woomeras, coolamons, water carriers and wooden shovels.
(11.) The shoes worn by a Kurdaitcha man (one who has either been formally selected, or goes out on his own initiative, to avenge the injury by magic of someone) woven from feathers and human hair.
Jarnpa/Jilpirda is a man with special powers to make himself invisible and equated with the Kurdaitcha. Kuuku is a term for bogeymen and used mainly to scare children.
It is not at all clear what, if anything, these practices have in common, for some of them seem to be 'witchcraft,' nor is it clear that they might resemble the kurdaitcha man practices reported by Spencer and Gillen for Australian aboriginal peoples.
Some of the images were staged for the purposes of illustration, such as those dealing with the Kurdaitcha man (Spencer & Gillen 1899:482) and the Illapurinja woman (1899:487).
In Central Australia, such people are called by the more familiar name, kadaitcha or kurdaitcha, a word that has now entered the general Australian vocabulary.
Carnegie (1998:236) discussed these sandals in the light of his reading of the journals of the Horn Scientific Expedition, and compared them with 'Kurdaitcha' shoes.