kvell


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Related to kvell: kvetch

kvell

 (kvĕl) Slang
intr.v. kvelled, kvell·ing, kvells
To feel or express pride about something or someone: "It is lovely to kvell for friends' and colleagues' success" (Henry Alford).

[Yiddish kveln, to be delighted with, beam with pride, from Middle High German quellen, to gush, from Old High German quellan; akin to Old English cwylla, spring, water well.]

kvell

(kvɛl)
vb
(intr) informal chiefly US to be happy or show satisfaction
[C20: from Yiddish kveln to well up]

kvell

(kvɛl) Slang. v.i.
to be extraordinarily pleased; esp., to be bursting with pride, as over one's family.
[1965–70, Amer.; < Yiddish kveln be delighted; compare Middle High German, German quellen to well up, gush]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois will hold a "Kvell and Tell" session on Sunday, June 23, 2019, as part of the group's annual meeting.
While our classical texts and traditions presume a two-parent household, if our biblical forebears could see the kinds of possibilities that exist for us now--including the choice of single parenthood--I think they would kvell.
Zelda would kvell her deepest kvells when an acting student made an unforeseen breakthrough in a production.
But the only Yiddish I heard outside of my father's road rage was infrequent, not part of the curriculum, and common: Shlep, kvell, meshugenah.
Fox, certainly, has every reason to kvell. But based strictly on merit, would the TV Critics Assn, really have anointed the show "program of the year," except for the fact that journalists understandably want to grab these Lyons by the tail and hang on for all that's worth?
The exact number and age of the pupils questioned is unknown, but it is known that in 1919 the school had 38 pupils and in 1938 there were 46 pupils (Kvell, 2003).
There was nothing she liked better than to kvell over their accomplishments at every stage of their lives.
The artistic family's response to the near tragedy, a piece called "See," makes its world premiere this weekend when Dance Theatre of Oregon performs the seven-minute piece on a program that also includes DTO's production of the children's story "Heidi" and a high-energy piece called "Kvell."
Two simple words in that context spoke volumes: More than upholding an age-old tradition that would make parents kvell, they communicated to Middle America that a Jewish main character does not need a gentile foil to validate his or her presence on television.
You know, in Jewish culture that word kvell -- your parents kvell, they're proud of you, they want to constantly talk about the things that you've done and your accomplishments -- that's my dad.