kymograph

(redirected from kymographs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ky·mo·graph

 (kī′mə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument for recording variations in pressure, as of the blood, or in tension, as of a muscle, by means of a pen or stylus that marks a rotating drum.

[Greek kūma, something swollen; see cyma + -graph.]

ky′mo·graph′ic adj.

kymograph

(ˈkaɪməˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf) or

cymograph

n
1. (Medicine) med a rotatable drum for holding paper on which a tracking stylus continuously records variations in blood pressure, respiratory movements, etc
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics this device as applied to the measurement of variations in the muscular action of the articulatory organs
3. (Aeronautics) an instrument for recording the angular oscillations of an aircraft in flight
[C20: from Greek kuma wave + -graph]
ˌkymoˈgraphic, ˌcymoˈgraphic adj

ky•mo•graph

(ˈkaɪ məˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
an instrument for measuring and graphically recording variations in fluid pressure, as those of the human pulse.
[1865–70]
ky`mo•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kymograph - scientific instrument consisting of a rotating drum holding paper on which a stylus traces a continuous record (as of breathing or blood pressure)
scientific instrument - an instrument used by scientists
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Starling Long Extension Kymographs With Time Markers.
I am sure you recognize at least one of the following: chalk, slide rule, kymographs, camera lucida, or opaque projector.
37-51)--psychologists utilizing familiar and modified physiological instruments such as tuning forks (for "recording vibrations and marking time"), kymographs ("to record any process whose course is a function of time elapsed"), chronographs (used for measuring reaction-time in relation to sense impressions), phonautographs (for making graphic recordings and taking measurements of speech), and other apparatus could accurately "photograph," as one psychologist put it, a range of putatively "transient phenomena" (Cattell, pp.