labour force

(redirected from labor forces)
Also found in: Financial.
Related to labor forces: Participation rate
Translations

labour force

, (US) labor force
nArbeiterschaft f; (of company)Belegschaft f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

labour force

labor force (Am) nmanodopera
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Meantime the packers had set themselves definitely to the task of making a new labor force. A thousand or two of strikebreakers were brought in every night, and distributed among the various plants.
Whatever their differences, both countries' governments have been grossly unfair to their labor forces, with Turkey tending toward neglect, Mexico actively using the broom of Titoism, and both destabilizing neighboring countries, provoking frictions and even unnecessary conflicts.
In Yugoslavia, however, the system failed to produce enough jobs to fully employ Yugoslavs because the socialist worker-managers viewed new additions to the labor force as "profit" poachers who would cut into their share of the "profit" pie.
The white population and labor force is significantly larger than the black, Hispanic, or Asian and other population and labor forces.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has made labor force projections since the late 1950s.
The range of alternatives being considered could change the relative sizes of the black and Hispanic populations and labor forces.
As the baby-boom generation ages, the median age of the work force rises to a new record in 2006; the Hispanic labor force could exceed that of blacks
The labor forces of men and of women have been growing at different rates for years.
By 2005, the labor force-those working or looking for work-is projected by the bureau of Labor Statistics to number 151 million, an increase of 26 million from 1990.(1) This figure represents a projected increase of 21 percent, a slowing from the increase of 33 percent over the previous 15-year period, 1975 to 1990, when the labor force grew by 31 million.
The following tabulation shows how the relative sizes of the youth and the adult labor forces changed between 1959 and 1979 and how the jobless rates for the two groups went in opposite directions:
As millions of baby-boomers entered the world of work as teenagers and young adults in the late 1960's and throughout most of the 1970's, they swelled the ranks of a group which, mainly because of frequent entries into and exits from the labor force, has traditionally had a much higher incidence of unemployment than older workers.
They ask questions about how experiences in youth, including schooling experiences, affect labor force activity, income, and productivity in later life.