laboriously


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la·bo·ri·ous

 (lə-bôr′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Marked by or requiring long, hard work: spent many laborious hours on the project.
2. Hard-working; industrious.

[Middle English, from Old French laborieux, from Latin labōriōsus, from labor, labor.]

la·bo′ri·ous·ly adv.
la·bo′ri·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.laboriously - in a laborious manner; "their lives were spent in committee making decisions for others to execute on the basis of data laboriously gathered for them"

laboriously

adverb
Translations
بإرهاق، بصورةٍ شاقَّه
namáhavě
meî erfiîismunum
büyük çaba sarfederek

laboriously

[ləˈbɔːrɪəslɪ] ADV [work] → laboriosamente (pej) [write] → farragosamente

laboriously

[ləˈbɔːriəsli] advlaborieusementlabor union n (US)syndicat m

laboriously

advmühsam; speakumständlich

laboriously

[ləˈbɔːrɪəslɪ] advfaticosamente, laboriosamente

labour

(American) labor (ˈleibə) noun
1. hard work. The building of the cathedral involved considerable labour over two centuries; People engaged in manual labour are often badly paid.
2. workmen on a job. The firm is having difficulty hiring labour.
3. (in a pregnant woman etc) the process of childbirth. She was in labour for several hours before the baby was born.
4. used (with capital) as a name for the Socialist party in the United Kingdom.
verb
1. to be employed to do hard and unskilled work. He spends the summer labouring on a building site.
2. to move or work etc slowly or with difficulty. They laboured through the deep undergrowth in the jungle; the car engine labours a bit on steep hills.
laborious (ləˈboːriəs) adjective
difficult; requiring hard work. Moving house is always a laborious process.
laˈboriously adverb
laˈboriousness noun
ˈlabourer noun
a workman who is employed to do heavy work requiring little skill. the labourers on a building site.
ˈlabour court noun
a court of law for settling disputes between management and workers.
ˈlabour dispute noun
a disagreement between management and workers about working conditions, pay etc.
ˈlabour-saving adjective
intended to lessen work. washing-machines and other labour-saving devices.
References in classic literature ?
The foreman seated himself near the candle, produced from his breast pocket a pencil and scrap of paper and wrote rather laboriously the following verdict, which with various degrees of effort all signed:
He was delighted at the unexpected rapidity of his pupil's progress, but could not abandon the edifice of argument he had laboriously constructed.
And after this warning, if he shall be of opinion that he can find enough of serious in other parts of this history, he may pass over these, in which we profess to be laboriously dull, and begin the following books at the second chapter.
The cruelty with which he shattered the world she had built up for herself so laboriously to enable her to endure her hard life, the injustice with which he had accused her of affectation, of artificiality, aroused her.
As for Passepartout, his face was as red as the sun's disc when it sets in the mist, and he laboriously inhaled the biting air.
I never used my razor during my stay in the island, but although a very subordinate affair, it had been vastly admired by the Typees; and Narmonee, a great hero among them, who was exceedingly precise in the arrangements of his toilet and the general adjustment of is person, being the most accurately tattooed and laboriously horrified individual in all the valley, thought it would be a great advantage to have it applied to the already shaven crown of his head.
Some have even brought bones--brought them laboriously from great distances, and were grieved to hear the surgeon pronounce them only bones of mules and oxen.
Strickland, breathing laboriously, kept an angry silence.
If it is in winter, it is yonder, crawling on the carpet, it is laboriously climbing upon an ottoman, and the mother trembles lest it should approach the fire.
The tanning he had done himself, slowly and laboriously, in frontier fashion.
Up and up the steep spiral of a very late Beethoven sonata she climbed, like a person ascending a ruined staircase, energetically at first, then more laboriously advancing her feet with effort until she could go no higher and returned with a run to begin at the very bottom again.
Perkins followed; she had several petitions at her command, good sincere ones too, but a little cut and dried, made of scripture texts laboriously woven together.